Roger A. Grimes

Columnist

Roger A. Grimes is a contributing editor. Roger holds more than 40 computer certifications and has authored ten books on computer security. He has been fighting malware and malicious hackers since 1987, beginning with disassembling early DOS viruses. He specializes in protecting host computers from hackers and malware, and consults to companies from the Fortune 100 to small businesses. A frequent industry speaker and educator, Roger currently works for KnowBe4 as the Data-Driven Defense Evangelist.

Be paranoid: 10 terrifying extreme hacks

Be paranoid: 10 terrifying extreme hacks

Nothing is safe, thanks to the select few hacks that push the limits of what we thought possible

6 hard truths security pros must learn to live with

6 hard truths security pros must learn to live with

Caveat emptor: Security solutions will always fall short in addressing the fundamental flaws of securing IT systems

7 warning signs an employee has gone rogue

7 warning signs an employee has gone rogue

Trust and IT go hand in hand. Here are the red flags to watch for before you get burned

10 security mistakes that will get you fired

10 security mistakes that will get you fired

From killing critical business systems to ignoring a critical security event, these colossal slip-ups will get your career in deep water quick

The BadUSB exploit is deadly, but few may be hit

The BadUSB exploit is deadly, but few may be hit

It's a case of good news/bad news with the BadUSB firmware exploit

11 signs you've been hacked -- and how to fight back

Redirected Net searches, unexpected installs, rogue mouse pointers: Here's what to do when you've been 0wned

Security-vendor snake oil: 7 promises that don't deliver

Beware bold promises from a multibillion-dollar industry that can't prevent your IT systems from being routinely hacked

6 lessons learned about the scariest security threats

These hard-earned lessons of a longtime IT security pro may save you from the fallout of advanced persistent threats

7 sneak attacks used by today's most devious hackers

Most malware is mundane, but these innovative techniques are exploiting systems and networks of even the savviest users

Your IT project is toast: 11 early indicators to watch for

Your IT project is toast: 11 early indicators to watch for

No senior buy-in, minimum spec targets, a 'nothing can go wrong' mentality -- here's how to sense demise before your IT project meets its ignominious end

True tales of (mostly) white-hat hacking

Stings, penetration pwns, spy games -- it's all in a day’s work along the thin gray line of IT security

11 signs your IT project is doomed

No senior buy-in, minimum spec targets, a 'nothing can go wrong' mentality -- here's how to sense demise before your IT project meets its ignominious end

14 dirty IT tricks, security pros edition

Beware these underhanded techniques for draining IT security budgets and avoiding accountability

Windows RT: Fortified against malware

Windows RT devices and their apps set new high-water mark for Windows security. But without support for Active Directory, their enterprise use is limited

9 popular IT security practices that just don't work

The security products and techniques you rely on most aren't keeping you as secure as you think

10 crazy IT security tricks that actually work

IT security threats are constantly evolving. It's time for IT security pros to get ingenious

Verizon security report: Hacktivism up, insider threats down

Released today, the much-anticipated 2012 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report provides fresh insight into how hackers are stealing or exposing our data

Red alert: HTTPS has been hacked

There's now a tool that exploits a flaw in SSL and TLS. Will the industry respond fast enough?

Massive 'Lurid' APT attack targets dozens of government agencies

Using basic techniques, hackers managed to infiltrate networks of space-related agencies, diplomatic organizations, and more

Certificate hacks: PKI didn't fail us, humans did

After latest attack, GlobalSign stopped issuing SSL certificates. But the real problem is that few pay attention to warnings anyway

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