Robert L. Mitchell

Robert L. Mitchell is a technology writer. You can reach him at rmitchell60@gmail.com.

8 big trends in big data analytics

Meet Cobol's hard-core fans

These folks won't migrate, but the reason probably isn't what you're thinking

3D printing makes its move into production

The use of 3D printing for finished goods is about to disrupt manufacturing and supply chains in a big way. Here's why, and here's how IT will be critical to that transition

Where your personal data goes when you're not looking

What businesses know about any given individual is a lot. But what are companies doing with that data? Not as much as you might think -- at least not yet. Companies are getting more sophisticated, however.

The Internet of things at home: Why we should pay attention

Some of the current consumer products could lead into important enterprise tools

Pirates, cheats, and IT certs

Cheating is on the rise, but IT certification programs are fighting back

Virtualizing Oracle software: Don't pay for what you don't need

Moving Oracle databases to virtual infrastructure may not result in software savings. Here's why, and what you can do about it

Fast, cheap and easy: 5 IT certifications that won't break you

Here's a shortlist of relatively easy-to-obtain and inexpensive certs that are valued by employers

Ad tracking: Is anything being done?

With online tracking on the rise and Do Not Track efforts moving ahead slowly, users and browser vendors have been taking matters into their own hands

The paranoid's survival guide: How to protect your personal data

Security experts offer tips about how to retain your privacy -- as much as possible, anyway -- and how to surf the Web silently, among other things

8 sure-fire ways to screw up a cloud contract

Cloud licensing's become so complex that it's easy to pay too much or get burned later on. Here's how to make sure you're getting your money's worth

Iris ID systems go mainstream

Iris recognition finally seems ready to break into the mainstream, particularly in banking and law enforcement, as prices drop and systems get easier to use

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