Paul Venezia

Senior Contributing Editor

Paul Venezia is a veteran enterprise architect and senior contributing editor at InfoWorld, where he writes analyses and reviews.

Hit 'em where it hurts: Panama Papers, politicians, and encryption

Hit 'em where it hurts: Panama Papers, politicians, and encryption

The Panama Papers may be exactly the breach we needed to convince our shortsighted leaders of the folly of encryption backdoors

Microsoft embraces Linux -- way too late

Microsoft embraces Linux -- way too late

As usual, Microsoft is late to the party. But this isn't like all the other times that came before

Learn to question your questions in IT

Learn to question your questions in IT

Recognizing what you don't know is deceptively difficult, but it's often the difference between project success and failure

Death by a thousand updates

Death by a thousand updates

Rapid release cycles for operating systems and devices are worse than counterproductive

Fight, Apple, fight: Don’t let the feds kill our security

Fight, Apple, fight: Don’t let the feds kill our security

We either have strong encryption and unassailable digital privacy, or we have total madness

Why IT tasks take as long as they take

Why IT tasks take as long as they take

An hour or a week? For technical work, estimating the time required is the eternal challenge

Gigabits matter: Techies must spread tech literacy

Gigabits matter: Techies must spread tech literacy

Even successful, well-educated people can be taken in by fantastical stats and numbers. That's where our techie knowledge comes in

Review: Dell PowerEdge R330 stands tall for small shops

Review: Dell PowerEdge R330 stands tall for small shops

Single-socket, rack-mount R330 offers plentiful horsepower and flexibility to small offices and remote sites

Beware of one-click, fuss-free application stacks

Beware of one-click, fuss-free application stacks

Prebuilt stacks offer a handy shortcut, but sometimes the shortcut leads to a longer journey

On-demand streaming is up, so ISPs must drag it down

On-demand streaming is up, so ISPs must drag it down

The future of television is streamed content, but we must overcome massive industry inertia first

10 essential OS X command-line tips for power users

10 essential OS X command-line tips for power users

Believe it or not, the Mac GUI can't do everything -- or at least not as quickly or powerfully as these command-line utilities

Prepare now for the death of Flash and Java plug-ins

Prepare now for the death of Flash and Java plug-ins

Countless IT admin tools depend on these technologies. Do you have a plan to keep yours working?

Accidental sharing -- the plague of the always-connected era

Accidental sharing -- the plague of the always-connected era

In the age of social media, it’s not necessarily in a company’s best interests to provide clear and concise controls over information access

Hardcore computing: The nitty-gritty of embedded systems

Hardcore computing: The nitty-gritty of embedded systems

Want an in-depth, hands-on view of computing? Take a trip to the wild side with embedded systems

It's time for browsers to separate professional from personal

It's time for browsers to separate professional from personal

To keep personal and work-related browsing separate, wouldn’t it be handy to run isolated instances of a single browser?

Tech tremors: 5 bumps to brace for in the year ahead

Tech tremors: 5 bumps to brace for in the year ahead

If you thought 2015 was full of tossing and turning, wait until 2016 hits

Triumphs and tumbles: The Internet in 2015

Triumphs and tumbles: The Internet in 2015

The Internet survived cable monopolies, massive data breaches, and crypto dunderheads in 2015, but the battle is far from over

Let's encrypt -- because we really ought to

Let's encrypt -- because we really ought to

While politicians across the globe strive to undermine our security and privacy, the Let's Encrypt consortium is making Internet security free and easy

The Internet isn't ready for really big news

The Internet isn't ready for really big news

A worldwide, globally gripping news event would likely crash the major media providers, sending us back to our TVs and radios

Warning: Internet security turbulence ahead

Warning: Internet security turbulence ahead

As Internet growth approaches hyperspeed, security will get worse before it gets better

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