Matt Asay

Matt Asay is Head of Developer Ecosystem at Adobe at Adobe. With more than a decade in open source, Asay has served as VP of community at MongoDB; VP of business development at mobile HTML5 startup Strobe (now part of Facebook); chief operating officer at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; GM, Americas and VP of business development at Alfresco; and part of the team that helped put Novell on its open source track. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and earned his juris doctorate at Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues, and his MA from the University of Kent at Canterbury and his BA from Brigham Young University. Asay was one of InfoWorld's first bloggers.

How PostgreSQL just might replace your Oracle database

How PostgreSQL just might replace your Oracle database

Although heavily dependent on Oracle today, Salesforce seems to be seeking database freedom—and its efforts could result in the same freedom for all enterprises

Why developers focus on ‘loser’ iOS over ‘winner’ Android

Why developers focus on ‘loser’ iOS over ‘winner’ Android

Linux has beat closed-source operating systems in every hardware category, but in mobile its Android derivative just can’t win in the ecosystem competition

Who really contributes to open source

Who really contributes to open source

New data debunks several myths around which companies lead in open source contributions

Oracle’s cloud bravado masks its database despair

Oracle’s cloud bravado masks its database despair

Oracle is a fantastic database for yesteryear’s enterprise applications, but is a poor fit for modern, big data applications

20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

Most code remains closed and proprietary, even though open source now dominates enterprise platforms. How can that be?

Why Microsoft’s Cosmos DB may displace AWS’s cloud databases

Why Microsoft’s Cosmos DB may displace AWS’s cloud databases

Cosmos DB’s all-in-one-approach seems to be what developers really want, rather than an array of specific tools like AWS DynamoDB, Redshift, and Aurora

Google Cloud Platform’s secret sauce: Its time is now

Google Cloud Platform’s secret sauce: Its time is now

Google’s biggest strength is helping enterprises “run like Google”—something that even old-school companies have discovered they can now do

What to know before you get started with TensorFlow machine learning

What to know before you get started with TensorFlow machine learning

Machine learning isn’t something you buy but something you do. Use TensorFlow to experiment now with machine learning so you can build it into your DNA

Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

Postgres is old as dirt, yet over the past five years it has panned out as pure gold

Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

AWS, Microsoft, and Google are all racing to figure out how to turn their innovations into open source on-ramps to their proprietary services

Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

Open source usage has skyrocketed, but not the number of developers working on projects. Those who benefit need to pay developers to keep it all going

Paper tiger? Alibaba Cloud faces a steep challenge outside China

Paper tiger? Alibaba Cloud faces a steep challenge outside China

Alibaba’s cloud is the No. 3 public cloud globally—not Google—and it seeks to displace AWS as No. 1. But in China it is protected from competition through government ties

Cloud lockin is here to stay, so learn to love it

Cloud lockin is here to stay, so learn to love it

To get the benefits of the cloud means tapping into proprietary ecosystems. But there is one way to lessen the impact: change agility

The critics are wrong about AWS’s open source approach

The critics are wrong about AWS’s open source approach

Open source contributions aren’t selfless charity but a virtuous intersection of corporate, user, and community benefit. Which is how AWS approaches open source

Don’t take Oracle’s cloud-superiority claims too seriously

Don’t take Oracle’s cloud-superiority claims too seriously

Oracle’s relatively low investments in cloud computing make it hard to justify its claims of superiority for IaaS and PaaS

Why Ansible is the future of Red Hat—and automated devops

Why Ansible is the future of Red Hat—and automated devops

OpenShift gets all the attention, but the Ansible configuration automation tool for devops shows how to moving to the future seem boring

Why Microsoft will drive serious Linux innovation

Why Microsoft will drive serious Linux innovation

Microsoft, while maintaining its commitment to Windows, has made the necessary steps to not merely run on Linux but to help shape the future of Linux

How to do open source right: LinkedIn shows the way

How to do open source right: LinkedIn shows the way

LinkedIn is a model for producing open source code that really matters to a community—and highlights why developers would want to work for you

Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Unless Google can get its serverless act together, it may end up winning the container battle but losing the cloud war

If AWS is serious about Kubernetes, here’s what it must do

If AWS is serious about Kubernetes, here’s what it must do

Amazon’s new membership in the CNCF isn’t matched by actual code contributions to the Google-driven container project. That could ultimately hurt AWS

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