Matt Asay

Contributor

Matt Asay is a Principal at Amazon Web Services. Formerly, Asay was Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing, and community at MongoDB; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues.

Why open source needs more cloud

Why open source needs more cloud

There isn’t one model for doing open source right, but generally the path to success will involve growing the overall market—even at the expense of control

Are you sure you want to open source that project?

Are you sure you want to open source that project?

Take it from Lyft engineer and Envoy project lead Matt Klein. Unless you get more effort from outside than what you put in, open sourcing could be a mistake.

No, you don’t have to run like Google

No, you don’t have to run like Google

Just because Google, Amazon, or Facebook does it doesn’t mean you should. Here are four ‘best practices’ of the hyperscalers you have permission to ignore.

Hybrid cloud is where the action is

Hybrid cloud is where the action is

Enterprises should be more concerned with getting their hybrid cloud strategy right than worrying about multicloud.

The year of PostgreSQL is every year

The year of PostgreSQL is every year

Completely community-driven, with no centralized ownership, Postgres has been the elephant in the room for more than 30 years

Does Snowflake mean the end of open source?

Does Snowflake mean the end of open source?

The cloud-based enterprise data platform may mark the end of a decades-long run in the dominance of open source infrastructure

Kubernetes and cloud portability — it’s complicated

Kubernetes and cloud portability — it’s complicated

Kubernetes doesn’t offer the magical application portability you might expect, but something better

Linux is still the standard

Linux is still the standard

Linux not only paved the way for open source success, but has shaped how open source communities operate

Do developers really care about open source?

Do developers really care about open source?

If all a developer really wants is an API that’s open and a cost model that works, then maybe cloud is the best answer

Cloud is going to take time

Cloud is going to take time

Cloud spend will need to grow many more years before it becomes even a meaningful fraction of total IT spending

Open source has a people problem

Open source has a people problem

While open source software is free and infinitely reproducible, open source maintainers are precious and scarce

Why MongoDB is ‘fundamentally better’ for developers

Why MongoDB is ‘fundamentally better’ for developers

MongoDB co-founder and former CTO Eliot Horowitz reflects on the creation of MongoDB and his 13 years with the company

The community hat rules the company hat in open source

The community hat rules the company hat in open source

For kube-state-metrics maintainer and Red Hat employee Lili Cosic, what Red Hat wants from the project is beside the point

What comes after Kubernetes?

What comes after Kubernetes?

Kubernetes solves only half the problem of modernizing applications. The next stage will be filling the gap between Kubernetes and applications

What is Google’s Open Usage Commons — and why?

What is Google’s Open Usage Commons — and why?

Google’s new foundation provides trademark protection to open source projects, starting with Istio, Angular, and Gerrit. Not everyone is pleased

What does an open source maintainer do after burnout?

What does an open source maintainer do after burnout?

Maintaining an open source project is far different from coding, which is a problem if coding is what you love

Do we need so many databases?

Do we need so many databases?

We have hundreds of different databases to choose from for storing our data — and we need more

Digital transformation shifts into overdrive

Digital transformation shifts into overdrive

Companies that let developers choose the technology, while executives chart bold goals, will navigate the change best

How GraphQL turned web development on its head

How GraphQL turned web development on its head

With GraphQL, you get to build whatever API you like and let the client determine what data it wants to access. Just don’t call it a query language

How Redis scratched an itch — and changed databases forever

How Redis scratched an itch — and changed databases forever

For decades we were hamstrung by the belief the database was a ‘solved’ problem, until open source developers opened our eyes

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