Matt Asay

Contributor

Matt Asay is Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe, where previously he was vice president of mobile strategy. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing and community at MongoDB, a leading big data database company; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, a leading Linux and cloud vendor; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues. Asay writes regular columns for The Register, TechRepublic, and InfoWorld.

How to become a transformative enterprise in the cloud

How to become a transformative enterprise in the cloud

Guardian Life shows why cloud computing isn’t a technology problem solved by moving workloads out of private data centers and into public clouds

AWS adds blockchain and time-series databases

AWS adds blockchain and time-series databases

With three major functional upgrades to existing databases as well, the full complement of purpose-built AWS databases is now 15

Why Google Cloud’s new boss will fail like the old boss

Why Google Cloud’s new boss will fail like the old boss

The Google culture doesn’t care about enterprise, and replacing one seasoned enterprise exec with another won’t change that fact

Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters

Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters

Linux is just plumbing. The real OS—the real value—is with Kubernetes

Microsoft’s attempt to fork Kubernetes via AKS will fail

Microsoft’s attempt to fork Kubernetes via AKS will fail

Microsoft is a smart company, and increasingly savvy about open source. It should know better than to try to fork the container orchestration community

What IBM-Red Hat means to the cloud and developers

What IBM-Red Hat means to the cloud and developers

By buying Red Hat, IBM just bought itself a clue in hybrid cloud computing. And it just might work

How the cloud is driving the enterprise database

How the cloud is driving the enterprise database

Public cloud vendors building services that capture more and more enterprise data, potentially prophesying decades of self-inflicted enterprise lockin

MongoDB’s new license won’t solve its China problem

MongoDB’s new license won’t solve its China problem

We need to find ways to ensure commercial open source can thrive, without worrying about the big cloud providers sucking out all value without contributing back

How Azure became the place for open source in the cloud

How Azure became the place for open source in the cloud

Microsoft has truly embraced open source, in a radical shift rare for a big company—and developers should be very happy

Machine learning: How to go from theory to reality

Machine learning: How to go from theory to reality

A lack of skilled people continues to stymie the AI revolution. That’s why smart companies invest as much in cultural change as technology adoption—and Google shows how

Developers, not CIOs, are who drive your cloud strategy

Developers, not CIOs, are who drive your cloud strategy

Yes to multicloud and yes to hybrid cloud. But not because there’s some grand plan to limit lockin or deliver high availability

Business can’t win without developers, but you need more

Business can’t win without developers, but you need more

A surprising survey shows that lack of software development capabilities is the top inhibitor to business success. So, how do you fix that?

Watch out, MySQL: MariaDB could replace you

Watch out, MySQL: MariaDB could replace you

Even as MySQL’s popularity has flattened and even declined, MariaDB has boomed

If you have ambition, open source at scale is essential

If you have ambition, open source at scale is essential

“No proprietary software can solve all the problems of companies that operate at the scale of Didi,” says Li Luo, technical director of big data at Didi Chuxing, the Uber of China

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

As long as companies understand that good data science takes time in an enterprise, and give these people room to learn and grow, they won’t need shortcuts

When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

Leaving legacy RDMSs is hard, but eventually enterprises will break free of Oracle’s and others’ last grip on their data infrastructure

Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

Take full advantage of white-hat hackers to help you secure your code. And still do all the other security stuff you should do before you release your code

How Red Hat has come to dominate Kubernetes

How Red Hat has come to dominate Kubernetes

Kubernetes seems destined to rule enterprise infrastructure, but, oddly, only Google and Red Hat seem to be playing to win in Kubernetes

Database shift: Start with open source but finish with AWS

Database shift: Start with open source but finish with AWS

AWS seems to be building natural bridges between on-premises databases like MySQL and cloud services like Amazon Aurora

Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Developers once were quick to distinguish open source as “free as in freedom, not free as in beer.” Today, as GitHub shows, they demand the beer but are nonchalant about the freedom

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