Matt Asay

Matt Asay is Head of Developer Ecosystem at Adobe at Adobe. With more than a decade in open source, Asay has served as VP of community at MongoDB; VP of business development at mobile HTML5 startup Strobe (now part of Facebook); chief operating officer at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; GM, Americas and VP of business development at Alfresco; and part of the team that helped put Novell on its open source track. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and earned his juris doctorate at Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues, and his MA from the University of Kent at Canterbury and his BA from Brigham Young University. Asay was one of InfoWorld's first bloggers.

Developers, not CIOs, are who drive your cloud strategy

Developers, not CIOs, are who drive your cloud strategy

Yes to multicloud and yes to hybrid cloud. But not because there’s some grand plan to limit lockin or deliver high availability

Business can’t win without developers, but you need more

Business can’t win without developers, but you need more

A surprising survey shows that lack of software development capabilities is the top inhibitor to business success. So, how do you fix that?

Watch out, MySQL: MariaDB could replace you

Watch out, MySQL: MariaDB could replace you

Even as MySQL’s popularity has flattened and even declined, MariaDB has boomed

If you have ambition, open source at scale is essential

If you have ambition, open source at scale is essential

“No proprietary software can solve all the problems of companies that operate at the scale of Didi,” says Li Luo, technical director of big data at Didi Chuxing, the Uber of China

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

As long as companies understand that good data science takes time in an enterprise, and give these people room to learn and grow, they won’t need shortcuts

When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

Leaving legacy RDMSs is hard, but eventually enterprises will break free of Oracle’s and others’ last grip on their data infrastructure

Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

Take full advantage of white-hat hackers to help you secure your code. And still do all the other security stuff you should do before you release your code

How Red Hat has come to dominate Kubernetes

How Red Hat has come to dominate Kubernetes

Kubernetes seems destined to rule enterprise infrastructure, but, oddly, only Google and Red Hat seem to be playing to win in Kubernetes

Database shift: Start with open source but finish with AWS

Database shift: Start with open source but finish with AWS

AWS seems to be building natural bridges between on-premises databases like MySQL and cloud services like Amazon Aurora

Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Developers once were quick to distinguish open source as “free as in freedom, not free as in beer.” Today, as GitHub shows, they demand the beer but are nonchalant about the freedom

Oracle’s and IBM’s IaaS cloud strategy: Talk big, invest little

Oracle’s and IBM’s IaaS cloud strategy: Talk big, invest little

They’re both woefully behind AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, but you wouldn’t know it from their Scrooge-like investments in their cloud platforms

The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point

The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point

Is Red Hat’s OpenShift a fork of Kubernetes? No, but it still shouldn’t matter if it were

Making Kubernetes work for the average engineer—via PaaS

Making Kubernetes work for the average engineer—via PaaS

Despite being the hottest thing since, well, Docker, Kubernetes remains a dark art for most mainstream enterprises

The era of the cloud database has finally begun

The era of the cloud database has finally begun

Enterprises are waking up to discover that their database needs have changed dramatically—and that the old-school RDBMS is no longer the best tool

How AWS will own you through serverless computing

How AWS will own you through serverless computing

Billions of dollars invested in servers and software for serverless computing have given AWS 70 percent of the market—and the platform on which enterprise applications run

These new BI tools bridge the gap between analytics and modern applications

These new BI tools bridge the gap between analytics and modern applications

Emerging BI tools let developers be developers, without having to slow down to bother with the data silos they leave in their wake

Database decisions: AWS has changed the game for IT

Database decisions: AWS has changed the game for IT

Enterprises are figuring out that they likely need different database engines to power different parts of their applications. AWS has figured that out, too

Open source isn’t the community you think it is

Open source isn’t the community you think it is

The irony is that what makes open source work—and differ from commercial software—is that only a few developers do the major work on any project

Skip containers and do serverless computing instead

Skip containers and do serverless computing instead

Container technologies like Docker are very powerful, but require talent you can’t get. Serverless computing provides the same benefits—with talent you can actually get

How PostgreSQL just might replace your Oracle database

How PostgreSQL just might replace your Oracle database

Although heavily dependent on Oracle today, Salesforce seems to be seeking database freedom—and its efforts could result in the same freedom for all enterprises

Load More