Matt Asay

Contributor

Matt Asay runs partner marketing at MongoDB. Previously. Asay was a Principal at Amazon Web Services and Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing, and community at MongoDB; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues.

What AWS customers really care about

What open source gets wrong with Mastodon

What open source gets wrong with Mastodon

The open source alternative to Twitter is forgetting the customer experience in its rush to make a political statement about decentralization.

Don’t buy the cloud repatriation claptrap

Don’t buy the cloud repatriation claptrap

Some big names are pushing to bring workloads back from the cloud, but a lot more voices say stay, especially now.

Microsoft-ing your way through a recession

Microsoft-ing your way through a recession

The tech giant offers a model for tight times, and Matt has some advice for rightsizing your headcount.

Some rain in the AWS, Azure, and Google clouds

Some rain in the AWS, Azure, and Google clouds

With recession at the gates and cloud growth slowing, the big three cloud vendors still find ways to succeed.

Postgres is eating relational

Postgres is eating relational

It’s hard to compete with easy. PostgreSQL has a lot of great qualities, but being easy to use seals the deal for companies and consultants.

The cloud has a people problem

The cloud has a people problem

Cloud skills are complicated and in high demand. Smart enterprises need a practical approach to the staffing shortage, and smart employees need multicloud skills.

Google kicks up ‘openness’ a notch

Google kicks up ‘openness’ a notch

A series of smart decisions to create an open cloud ecosystem has moved the cloud giant into a position of power. But turning that openness into sustainable advantage won’t be easy.

Mozilla is looking for a scapegoat

Mozilla is looking for a scapegoat

The declining browser’s problem isn’t anti-competitive practices, it’s competition itself.

Which cloud is for you?

Which cloud is for you?

Despite all their commonalities, the big three cloud providers have some important personality differences that should factor into your choices.

When openness doesn’t matter

When openness doesn’t matter

We can argue about the choices tech companies should or shouldn’t make, but at the end of the day, we keep buying what they’re selling.

When is enough data enough?

When is enough data enough?

Maybe we don’t need more data, we just need people who understand the data we already have and its value in a business context.

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