Matt Asay

Contributor

Matt Asay is a Principal at Amazon Web Services. Formerly, Asay was Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing, and community at MongoDB; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues.

Why MongoDB is ‘fundamentally better’ for developers

The community hat rules the company hat in open source

The community hat rules the company hat in open source

For kube-state-metrics maintainer and Red Hat employee Lili Cosic, what Red Hat wants from the project is beside the point

What comes after Kubernetes?

What comes after Kubernetes?

Kubernetes solves only half the problem of modernizing applications. The next stage will be filling the gap between Kubernetes and applications

What is Google’s Open Usage Commons — and why?

What is Google’s Open Usage Commons — and why?

Google’s new foundation provides trademark protection to open source projects, starting with Istio, Angular, and Gerrit. Not everyone is pleased

What does an open source maintainer do after burnout?

What does an open source maintainer do after burnout?

Maintaining an open source project is far different from coding, which is a problem if coding is what you love

Do we need so many databases?

Do we need so many databases?

We have hundreds of different databases to choose from for storing our data — and we need more

Digital transformation shifts into overdrive

Digital transformation shifts into overdrive

Companies that let developers choose the technology, while executives chart bold goals, will navigate the change best

How GraphQL turned web development on its head

How GraphQL turned web development on its head

With GraphQL, you get to build whatever API you like and let the client determine what data it wants to access. Just don’t call it a query language

How Redis scratched an itch — and changed databases forever

How Redis scratched an itch — and changed databases forever

For decades we were hamstrung by the belief the database was a ‘solved’ problem, until open source developers opened our eyes

Will the solo open source developer survive the pandemic?

Will the solo open source developer survive the pandemic?

Many important projects are maintained by volunteer developers who may now have more pressing needs than volunteering

Open source projects take all kinds

Open source projects take all kinds

If you think open source projects only want users who contribute code, think again

Open source projects take all kinds — well, some do

Open source projects take all kinds — well, some do

You might think open source projects only want users who contribute code. It’s complicated

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