Visual Studio 2022 update improves search, Git integration

Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1 is now generally available for production use, while Visual Studio 2022 version 17.2 is available in a preview.

Visual Studio 2022 update improves search, Git integration
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Microsoft has made Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1 generally available for production use. At the same time, the company has released a preview of Visual Studio 2022 version 17.2.

Both were announced February 15. Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1 brings improvements in search, debugging, and Git-related capabilities. Visual Studio 2022 version 17.2 also enhances the Git experience while adding new C# features. Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1 follows the November release of Visual Studio 2022 version 17.0. Visual Studio 2022 is the first 64-bit edition of the IDE.

Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1 can be downloaded from Microsoft’s Visual Studio website. Instructions for accessing the Visual Studio 2022 version 17.2 preview can be found on the Visual Studio preview channel. With version 17.1, the indexed Find in Files capability, which promises faster and more productive search, is turned on by default. Version 17.1 also introduces an autosave feature, which allows developers to automatically save files when Visual Studio loses focus.

Git-related improvements in Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1 allow developers to compare a current branch with other branches in their repository, making it easier to keep track of branches while preparing for pull requests or branch deletion. Solution filters make it easier to load an entire dependency tree for all projects in the filter.

The following are some other new features and enhancements in Visual Studio 2022 version 17.1, based on release notes:

  • For debugging, a feature called StickyDataTips enables developers to keep DataTips expanded. Objects can be evaluated within DataTips.
  • For C++, a Configure Preset template lets developers build CMake projects on a remote MacOS system with CMakePresets.json. Developers can debug core dumps on a remote MacOS system from Visual Studio with LLDB or GDB.
  • The Code Definition Window now supports C# and Visual Basic.
  • A refactoring is now available to enable nullable reference types across a project, by adding the <Nullable>codeenable<Nullable> element to a project file or adding the #nullable enable pragma to source files in a project.
  • A Stack Trace Explorer window displays stack traces from the clipboard, allowing developers to click and navigate directly related code.
  • The number of reboots required after installation has been reduced.

As for the Visual Studio 2022 version 17.2 preview, release notes cite the following capabilities:

  • For a planned release of C# 11, raw string literals are being added. A refactoring is available as part of the preview release to convert a normal or verbatim string literal to a raw string literal.
  • The IDE now consumes 64-bit Git for Windows. Also for Git, line-staging support, or interactive staging, allows users to stage specific lines or chunks of code from the editor and the diff views.
  • For web tools, the Add Dependency dialog in Connected Services now has a search capability.
  • For .NET programming, IDE support for StringSyntaxAttribute code enables syntax highlighting based on the type of data the string represents. Also, a new refactoring removes unnecessary lambda expressions and calls the method group directly.

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