Cross-cloud software development comes to Azure

Cloud-native apps built on Kubernetes can run anywhere. Now, with Open Service Broker, they can also use services hosted in public clouds such as Azure

Back in the early 2000s, while working as an architect in an IT consulting company, I became fascinated by the promise of service-oriented architectures. Taking an API-first approach to application development made a lot of sense to me, as did the idea of using a message- and event-driven approach to application integration. But that dream was lost in a maze of ever-more complex standards. The relatively simple SOAP’s take on remote procedure calls vanished as a growing family of WS-* protocols added more and more features.

It’s not surprising, then, that I find much of what’s happening in the world of cloud-native platforms familiar. Today, we’re using many of the same concepts as part of building microservice architectures, on top of platforms like Kubernetes. Like SOAP, the underlying concept is an open set of tools that can connect applications and services, working in one public cloud, from on-premises systems to a public cloud, and from cloud to cloud. It’s that cross-cloud option that’s most interesting: Each of the three big public cloud providers does different things well, so why not build your applications around the best of Azure, AWS, and Google Cloud Platform?

Introducing the Open Service Broker

One of the key technologies for enabling this cross-cloud world is the open service broker. Building on the SOA concept of the service broker, the Open Service Broker API provides a way to take information from a platforms list of available services, automate the process of subscribing to a service, provision it, and connect it to an application. It can also handle the reverse, so when you no longer want to use a service, it removes the connection from your application instance and deprovisions the service.

Developed by a team from across several cloud-native platform providers, including Pivotal and Google, there are implementations for common platforms like Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes, and Open Shift. Microsoft has developing its own implementation of the Open Service Broker (OSB), with support for a selection of key Azure services, including Cosmos DB, Azure SQL, Azure Container Instances, and the Azure Service Bus.

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