Moving to the cloud? Don’t make these 3 big mistakes

Other enterprises have made big mistakes in their cloud deployments. Here they are, so you can avoid making the same cloud-migration mistakes

Moving to the cloud? Don’t make these 3 mistakes
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Most of the success with your cloud deployments comes from avoiding the errors that have cratered several cloud projects. I don’t want those of you reading this blog to repeat the same mistakes. 

Here are three common mistakes in cloud deployments that you can, and should, avoid making.

Cloud mistake No. 1: Chasing the new shiny objects

No matter if it’s serverless or containers, enterprises love what is new and hip. Although both serverless cloud computing and containers like Docker have a great deal of value, I often see them used in the wrong places for the wrong use cases. 

Any new technology that’s drawing the attention of the tech press—such as machine learning, deep learning, containers, internet of things, and serverless computing—needs to have a good business case which connects to a good use case. Without both a good business case and good use case, you could be forcing square pegs into round holes—no matter how cool it is. 

Cloud mistake No. 2: Not considering devops

Moving to cloud? Then you should move to a devops way of life, and to devops-enabling technology, as soon as you can. Why? Because it will make your cloud computing migration more agile and faster. 

The fact of the matter is that many enterprises moving to cloud reduce the value they get from cloud because their existing application development processes are still traditional waterfall. Although the waterfall approach works, it does not provide the ability to continuously improve application workloads or speed the production and deployment of new applications. 

Cloud mistake No. 3: Hiring for budget, not for talent

No matter if you’re using a consulting service or hiring directly, if you’re going cheap on cloud computing talent, you’ll get resources that will likely do more harm than good. Saving $1 million in salary can cost you $100 million in avoidable screw-ups. I see this every day.

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