Sun and Microsoft: Is Rich Green really gone?

According to an Ashlee Vance story in The Register, Java champion and VP Rich Green has left Sun, as Ashlee puts it, "in disgust." There are lots of reasons to question Sun's judgement in settling with Microsoft without trial. If The Register's facts are accurate, losing Green would be an expensive consequence of making nice with Sun's arch-nemesis. Rich Green is one hell of a guy. Smart, passionate, motivated,

According to an Ashlee Vance story in The Register, Java champion and VP Rich Green has left Sun, as Ashlee puts it, "in disgust." There are lots of reasons to question Sun's judgement in settling with Microsoft without trial. If The Register's facts are accurate, losing Green would be an expensive consequence of making nice with Sun's arch-nemesis.

Rich Green is one hell of a guy. Smart, passionate, motivated, and best of all, informed. The time I spent talking with him was never wasted. He never failed to speak his mind, and he wasn't the mouthpiece for the company line that is such a staple of vendor conferences. I wrote an InfoWorld column on "The F Word," which was Rich's memorable reference to Sun's fresh take on frameworks. And it really was fresh; this is the guy who held the promise of Sun becoming known as The Java Company. That's where its future lies. I believe that Mr. Green had the best grasp of this, and the best vision for achieving it, in all of Sun.

Losing Rich Green is neither the end of Java nor the end of Sun. Some high-profile departures, like that of Sun founder Bill Joy, have little consequence. But at Sun, where it seems like everyone is VP of something, Rich Green stood out as uniquely vice presidential in commitment and knowledge. I don't know what will happen to Green's vision of a broader, more standardized Java framework. I don't know what will happen to Green's passion to put Sun on top in the tools space. Sun needs to make specific commitments to continuing Green's projects.

--------