Sun comments on Hyper-V news (tough questions for Microsoft)

Microsoft's announcement today that Hyper-V is live is the big news of the day. Logically, responses are coming in from all over regarding this "official" move from Microsoft. One comment from Sun's Senior Director of xVM Vijay Sarathy is: "We're glad to see Microsoft finally entering the hypervisor market. Customers are hungry for virtualization solutions that support a wide range of operating systems and virtu

Microsoft's announcement today that Hyper-V is live is the big news of the day.

Logically, responses are coming in from all over regarding this "official" move from Microsoft. One comment from Sun's Senior Director of xVM Vijay Sarathy is:

"We're glad to see Microsoft finally entering the hypervisor market. Customers are hungry for virtualization solutions that support a wide range of operating systems and virtualization platforms. Simply put, Sun is committed to building a heterogeneous (Windows, Linux and Solaris) and interoperable (ESX and Hyper-V) virtualization platform. To that end, Sun has joined Microsoft's Server Virtualization Validation Program, supporting Windows as a guest operating system on Sun's xVM Server hypervisor," said Vijay Sarathy, Senior Director of xVM at Sun. "With Sun xVM VirtualBox, xVM VDI, xVM Server and xVM Ops Center Sun provides a holistic approach to Windows-focused customers looking for virtualization and management solutions. We've already seen great traction with Sun xVM VirtualBox, the industry's first free and open source hypervisor to offer support for all major operating systems, including Windows, which has already been downloaded more than 5 million times."

Sun also outlined some tough questions for Microsoft to consider around its new hypervisor technology:

1. Live migration is an important feature for customers to handle unplanned outages, as Sun and VMware have demonstrated through inclusion of live migration capabilities in their hypervisors. How will Hyper-V meet customers' migration needs without live migration?

2. Enterprises are widely adopting open source technologies in order to give their customers access to bleeding-edge features and functionalities. How do you see the proprietary Hyper-V competing with open source Xen-based hypervisors from Citrix and Sun?

3. Hyper-V only addresses Windows-based servers despite the fact that most datacenters are incredibly heterogeneous and require support for more than just Windows workloads. Aren't you underestimating the complexity and diversity of your customers' datacenters?

4. How do you see Hyper-V aiding in the reduction of energy consumption when it can only consolidate Windows-based servers?

5. Microsoft has been criticized for not being able to scale and grow with its customers. How do you address that?

6. How do you plan to manage physical infrastructure with Hyper-V?

Note: For more information about Sun xVM, check out the homepage here.

Great questions, one and all. No doubt once the folks on the Hyper-V team finish celebrating, they will read this post, answer these questions for us, and we will have a follow-up post with the answers.

Until then, you might want to check out the new Edge TechNet site for some great videos by the leading Hyper-V developers. You might even see a cool new video of yours truly taken at TechEd 2008!

Copyright © 2008 IDG Communications, Inc.

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