Build your own IPv6 lab on the cheap, part 1

IPv6 might not be quite here yet, but it's coming; here's how to get ahead of the familiarity curve now by building your own lab

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Then configure NAT to translate the inside addresses on the eth1 interface to the interface address of the outside interface:

set service nat rule 10 outbound-interface 'eth0'

set service nat rule 10 source address '192.168.1.0/24'

set service nat rule 10 type 'masquerade'

Next up, configure the router to proxy DNS requests to an internet-based DNS server (in this case, I've used Google Public DNS services because my ISP fiddles with their DNS servers to deliver ads more than I like, but you can use any public DNS service, such as OpenDNS, if you're not a fan of Google):

set service dns forwarding cache-size '150'

set service dns forwarding listen-on 'eth1'

set service dns forwarding name-server '8.8.8.8'

set service dns forwarding name-server '8.8.4.4'

Configure DNS for the router itself (so that you can ping things by name):

set system name-server '8.8.8.8'

set system name-server '8.8.4.4'

Finally, configure the outside interface to grab an IP from the ISP:

set interfaces ethernet eth0 address 'dhcp'

Once you've committed all of that, you should be able to browse the Web from your workstation. Hooray! Now that we have IPv4 working, it's time to move on to IPv6!

This article, "Build your own IPv6 lab on the cheap, part 1," originally appeared at InfoWorld.com. Read more of Matt Prigge's Information Overload blog and follow the latest developments in storage at InfoWorld.com. For the latest business technology news, follow InfoWorld.com on Twitter.

Copyright © 2011 IDG Communications, Inc.

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