The PC is dying; long live personal computing!

Windows PCs' market share is plummeting -- mainly due to the changing definition of a PC and the rise of the post-PC vision

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Tablets, like smartphones, provide another feature: People tend to talk about using a tablet or a smartphone or a PC. Increasingly, people use multiple devices simultaneously. In my case, I have my iPad next to my keyboard so that I can quickly check my Twitter feed or email without rearranging my computer's screen. It pings me and displays a notice when I have an appointment in a more visible way than OS X Mountain Lion's notifications -- without affecting my computer's activities.

It's not that I couldn't easily switch views on the computer, but why mess up the collection of related activities there when I can simply turn to a separate screen for a quick check on an unrelated item? This too is post-PC computing.

We're seeing a profound change in personal computing. Call it post-PC as I do or PC-plus, à la Microsoft and Lenovo -- it doesn't matter. A PC is now longer just a Windows PC or a Mac; it's an often-mobile, digital device that lets you do stuff. In fact, it's a collection of such devices with different screen sizes, input methods, capabilities, and operating systems. What we used to call a PC is now part of a new, wondrous world of anywhere, anytime capability whose makeup is still evolving.

You don't need to give up your PC to be post-PC, though many people could. But it's not a zero-sum game. That's what's so cool about it: The hardware is changing, but the capabilities are keeping up. Don't be surprised if the post-PC world looks a lot like what we already know.

This article, "The PC is dying; long live personal computing!," was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Read more of Galen Gruman's Mobile Edge blog and follow the latest developments in mobile technology at InfoWorld.com. Follow Galen's mobile musings on Twitter at MobileGalen. For the latest business technology news, follow InfoWorld.com on Twitter.

Copyright © 2013 IDG Communications, Inc.

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