Ultimate cloud speed tests: Amazon vs. Google vs. Windows Azure

A diverse set of real-world Java benchmarks shows Google is fastest, Azure is slowest, and Amazon is priciest

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Page 3
Page 3 of 7

The results (see charts and tables below) will look like a mind-numbing sea of numbers to anyone, but a few patterns stood out:

  • Google was the fastest overall. The three Google instances completed the benchmarks in a total of 575 seconds, compared with 719 seconds for Amazon and 834 seconds for Windows Azure. A Google machine had the fastest time in 13 of the 14 tests. A Windows Azure machine had the fastest time in only one of the benchmarks. Amazon was never the fastest.
  • Google was also the cheapest overall, though Windows Azure was close behind. Executing the DaCapo suite on the trio of machines cost 3.78 cents on Google, 3.8 cents on Windows Azure, and 5 cents on Amazon. A Google machine was the cheapest option in eight of the 14 tests. A Windows Azure instance was cheapest in five tests. An Amazon machine was the cheapest in only one of the tests.
  • The best option for misers was Windows Azure's Small VM (one CPU, 6 cents per hour), which completed the benchmarks at a cost of 0.67 cents. However, this was also one of the slowest options, taking 404 seconds to complete the suite. The next cheapest option, Google's n1-highcpu-2 instance (two CPUs, 13.1 cents per hour), completed the benchmarks in half the time (193 seconds) at a cost of 0.70 cents.
  • If you cared more about speed than money, Google's n1-standard-8 machine (eight CPUs, 82.9 cents per hour) was the best option. It turned in the fastest time in 11 of the 14 benchmarks, completing the entire DaCapo suite in 101 seconds at a cost of 2.32 cents. The closest rival, Amazon's m3.2xlarge instance (eight CPUs, $0.90 per hour), completed the suite in 118 seconds at a cost of 2.96 cents.
  • Amazon was rarely a bargain. Amazon's m1.medium (one CPU, 10.4 cents per hour) was both the slowest and the most expensive of the one CPU instances. Amazon's m3.2xlarge (eight CPUs, 90 cents per hour) was the second fastest instance overall, but also the most expensive. However, Amazon's c3.large (two CPUs, 15 cents per hour) was truly competitive -- nearly as fast overall as Google's two-CPU instance, and faster and cheaper than Windows Azure's two CPU machine.

These general observations, which I drew from the "standing start" tests, are also borne out by the results of the "converged" runs. But a close look at the individual numbers will leave you wondering about consistency.

Some of this may be due to the randomness hidden in the cloud. While the companies make it seem like you're renting a real machine that sits in a box in some secret, undisclosed bunker, the reality is that you're probably getting assigned a thin slice of a box. You're sharing the machine, and that means the other users may or may not affect you. Or maybe it's the hypervisor that's behaving differently. It's hard to know. Your speed can change from minute to minute and from machine to machine, something that usually doesn't happen with the server boxes rolling off the assembly line.

Cloud benchmark results - time
Cloud benchmark results - cost
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Page 3
Page 3 of 7
How to choose a low-code development platform