Paul Venezia

Columnist

Paul Venezia is a veteran *nix system and network architect, and senior contributing editor at InfoWorld, where he writes analysis, reviews and The Deep End blog.

The Ashley Madison hack -- this time it's personal

The weak case against strong encryption

The weak case against strong encryption

Why can't politicians understand? Banning encryption is essentially no different than mandating backdoors

Encryption with backdoors is worse than useless -- it's dangerous

Encryption with backdoors is worse than useless -- it's dangerous

In the debate over strong encryption, it’s clear the feds don’t understand what they’re saying

Do we really need the Internet?

Do we really need the Internet?

One FCC commissioner appears to think that we don't, but perhaps he doesn't understand the question

The most dangerous data breach ever known

The most dangerous data breach ever known

If the federal government can't protect extraordinarily sensitive data on its own employees, should it be collecting data on the rest of us?

Net neutrality will prove as evil as the VCR

Net neutrality will prove as evil as the VCR

Everything old is new again, and the same tired threats will prove to be false once more

Build from best practices, but use your judgement too

Build from best practices, but use your judgement too

Sometimes best practices avoid past mistakes, and sometimes they create new ones

SourceForge: The end can't come too soon

SourceForge: The end can't come too soon

Don’t look now, but one of the first and largest open-source project hosting services has turned into a zombie

Those maddening, mysterious networking problems

Those maddening, mysterious networking problems

No matter how impossible it seems, there must be a solution -- and we have no choice but to find it

Code injection: A new low for ISPs

Code injection: A new low for ISPs

Beyond underhanded, Comcast and other carriers are inserting their own ads and notifications into their customers’ data streams

The Venom vulnerability: Little details bite back

The Venom vulnerability: Little details bite back

Bad attacks rarely come through the front door -- instead, the old cracks let in the problems

Flexibility vs. complexity: IT's double-edged sword

Flexibility vs. complexity: IT's double-edged sword

Sometimes a fixed path is beneficial, and sometimes you need room to maneuver

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