Oracle to Java devs: Stop signing JAR files with MD5

Starting in April, if a JAR file is signed with MD5, Oracle will treat it as unsigned

Oracle to Java devs: Stop signing JAR files with MD5
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Starting in April, Oracle will treat JAR files signed with the MD5 hashing algorithm as if they were unsigned, which means modern releases of the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) will block those JAR files from running. The shift is long overdue, as MD5’s security weaknesses are well-known, and more secure algorithms should be used for code signing instead.

“Starting with the April Critical Patch Update releases, planned for April 18, 2017, all JRE versions will treat JARs signed with MD5 as unsigned,” Oracle wrote on its Java download page.

Code-signing JAR files bundled with Java libraries and applets is a basic security practice as it lets users know who actually wrote the code, and it has not been altered or corrupted since it was written. In recent years, Oracle has been beefing up Java’s security model to better protect systems from external exploits and to allow only signed code to execute certain types of operations. An application without a valid certificate is potentially unsafe.

Newer versions of Java now require all JAR files to be signed with a valid code-signing key, and starting with Java 7 Update 51, unsigned or self-signed applications are blocked from running.

Code signing is an important part of Java’s security architecture, but the MD5 hash weakens the very protections code signing is supposed to provide. Dating back to 1992, MD5 is used for one-way hashing: taking an input and generating a unique cryptographic representation that can be treated as an identifying signature. No two inputs should result in the same hash, but since 2005, security researchers have repeatedly demonstrated that the file could be modified and still have the same hash in collisions attacks. While MD5 is no longer used for TLS/SSL—Microsoft deprecated MD5 for TLS in 2014—it remains prevalent in other security areas despite its weaknesses.

With Oracle’s change, “affected MD-5 signed JAR files will no longer be considered trusted [by the Oracle JRE] and will not be able to run by default, such as in the case of Java applets, or Java Web Start applications,” Erik Costlow, an Oracle product manager with the Java Platform Group, wrote back in October.

Developers need to verify that their JAR files have not been signed using MD5, and if it has, re-sign affected files with a more modern algorithm. Administrators need to check with vendors to ensure the files are not MD5-signed. If the files are still running MD5 at the time of the switchover, users will see an error message that the application could not go. Oracle has already informed vendors and source licensees of the change, Costlow said.

In cases where the vendor is defunct or unwilling to re-sign the application, administrators can disable the process that checks for signed applications (which has serious security implications), set up custom Deployment Rule Sets for the application’s location, or maintain an Exception Site List, Costlow wrote.

There was plenty of warning. Oracle stopped using MD5 with RSA algorithm as the default JAR signing option with Java SE6, which was released in 2006. The MD5 deprecation was originally announced as part of the October 2016 Critical Patch Update and was scheduled to take effect this month as part of the January CPU. To ensure developers and administrators were ready for the shift, the company has decided to delay the switch to the April Critical Patch Update, with Oracle Java SE 8u131 and corresponding releases of Oracle Java SE 7, Oracle Java SE 6, and Oracle JRockit R28.

“The CA Security Council applauds Oracle for its decision to treat MD5 as unsigned. MD5 has been deprecated for years, making the move away from MD5 a critical upgrade for Java users,” said Jeremy Rowley, executive vice president of emerging markets at Digicert and a member of the CA Security Council.

Deprecating MD5 has been a long time coming, but it isn’t enough. Oracle should also look at deprecating SHA-1, which has its own set of issues, and adopt SHA-2 for code signing. That course of action would be in line with the current migration, as major browsers have pledged to stop supporting websites using SHA-1 certificates. With most organizations already involved with the SHA-1 migration for TLS/SSL, it makes sense for them to also shift the rest of their certificate and key signing infrastructure to SHA-2.

The good news is that Oracle plans to disable SHA-1 in certificate chains anchored by roots included by default in Oracle’s JDK at the same time MD5 gets deprecated, according to the JRE and JDK Crypto Roadmap, which outlines technical instructions and information about ongoing cryptographic work for Oracle JRE and Oracle JDK. The minimum key length for Diffie-Hellman will also be increased to 1,024 bits later in 2017.

The road map also claims Oracle recently added support for the SHA224withDSA and SHA256withDSA signature algorithms to Java 7, and disabled Elliptic Curve (EC) for keys of less than 256 bits for SSL/TLS for Java 6, 7, and 8.