How well does Pokemon Go run on Android phones?

Also in today's open source roundup: Pokemon Go now supports Android N, and why you shouldn't fake your location while playing Pokemon Go

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How well does Pokemon GO run on Android?

Pokemon GO is all the rage these days, with millions and millions of people playing it as they walk around with their phones. But how well does Pokemon GO run on Android phones?

This question came up in a thread on the Android subreddit and folks there shared their experiences running Pokemon GO:

Programming-Painting: “How well is Pokemon Go working on your phone? So I’ve found GPS and battery usage go through the roof. My phone barely can run it but a iphone 5c runs it perfectly.

What have been your experiences?”

Hookem125: “Nexus 6P user here - runs alright but of course huge battery drain. I wouldn’t drop Android for an iPhone over this app - I personally know iPhone 6S users who are experiencing more performance issues than I am.”

1976dave: “Nexus 5X, game works well. I play with AR off because I just don’t like the AR, as it causes slow downs.

Game plays well for the most part. Crashes sometimes like at gyms but I think this is typical with many people’s experiences. Phone hardly gets warm while playing, and I played for like 2.5 or 3 hours and used about 75% of my battery.”

Naterjack: “On my Nexus 5X the phone becomes super hot when playing (and on some other apps for no apparent reason). Are you rooted or using a custom rom? Have you ever had the same issues?”

Scarbutt1: “Mine gets super hot playing it as well.”

Rampage646: “Same here, it’s like a portable heater. Although not as bad as previous phones I’ve owned. Sits around 45°C when playing for a long time.”

Popups4life: “Runs well on the Droid Turbo. The phone heats up more noticeably than when I play ingress.”

Najodlegleszy: “Z3c. I left with 80% battery, spend about 2.5 h hunting Pokemon and claiming gyms, had enough juice to come back home listening to music. I love this phone.”

Avi–2187: “lg g3 here, horribly. goes through a percent a minute at best. Also lags a lot, and loading time is around 30 seconds to a minute. Get alot of freezes and hangs on pokestops, throwing pokeballs, and fighting gyms.”

Gedankenreich: “Runs fine on my Galaxy S6 - the only screen that sometimes makes trouble is the detail view of a pokemon. But I guess it’s the server because it doesn’t happen all the time - looks like it sometimes takes longer to load the minimap where it was captured.

It kills the battery (like Ingress) but I get about 3 hours+ of continously playing without a problem and the fast charging is very nice with a quick charge compatible powerbank.

What helps a lot is that the display goes very bright and very dim so it’s great at very sunny days and dark nights.”

Troll_berry_pie: “One plus 2. GPS and graphics are amazing. Can be a passenger in a car or public transport and never lose signal and easily use a passing pokestop. Game has never crashed on me.

Battery life is abysmal, I lose 1% a minute even on lowest brightness.

A family member has a Oneplus X. Graphics are good. Loading times are good. They haven’t been able to use pokestops when we drive past them though (the spinning token hasn’t loaded by the time we are there and by the time we have passed it’s just loaded). They have had the game glitch twice after catching pokemon (screen won’t move onto next screen). Battery life is amazing thouggh.

They are on a different provider to me though that has a weaker internet signal in my town so their problems may be due to that.”

More at Reddit

Pokemon GO now supports Android N

When Pokemon GO was first released, many gamers were disappointed to find out that it didn’t support Android N. But that has changed with a recent update to the game, and now those running Android N can play Pokemon GO.

Abner Li reports for 9to5Google:

…Pokemon Go for Android has just received an update to version 0.29.2. The most notable feature is support for devices running the Android N Developer Preview.

Unlike the iOS version, the update did not come with release notes on Google Play or the Pokemon Go site. The only major change seems to be support for Android 7.0 Nougat. During the field test, opening the app on Android N devices would just show a grey screen.

After entering a birth date, the latest version fully loads and allows users to sign-in with either Google or a Pokemon Trainer Club account. Performance seems unchanged and the update likely focuses on crashes and bug fixes.

More at 9to5Google

Why you shouldn’t fake your location while playing Pokemon GO

A hot game like Pokemon GO is bound to bring out cheaters along with other gamers, and some players have figured out how to fake their locations. But a writer at Android Central points out why doing so is a very bad idea.

Russell Holly reports for Android Central:

Pokemon Go is a location-based game, where you have to go to a physical location in the real world in order to accomplish a task and do better in the game. Or is it? Pokemon Go forums are lousy with super secret ways to fake your location in the game so you can more easily get the things you want.

Here’s the thing, though. The folks that make Pokemon Go have been doing this for a while, and if you follow this one weird trick to score all the Pokemon without leaving your home, you’re account is going to be banned in a hurry.

…Niantic took some time to make sure there were tools in place to stop people from faking their location.

It’s not a perfect system, and there are still people who claim to be very careful about their faked locations in order to get away with this sort of thing. But for every person you find who figured out the ultra-secret method for cheating in Ingress and Pokemon Go, you’ll find at least five people who tried to replicate those techniques and got themselves banned.

More at Android Central

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