Why an iPhone user switched to Android after six years

In today's open source roundup: A dedicated iPhone user switches to Android after six years. Plus: Tails 1.7 has been released. And what's new in Fedora 23

A user switches to Android after six years of iPhones

There's been quite a lot of stories in the media about Android users switching to the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus. But there are also some iPhone users who have gone the other way and switched to Android.

One user made the jump to Android after six years of using iPhones and he shared his thoughts in a detailed blog post after using Android for one month.

Here's a sample of what he had to say:

I have to admit, that the thoughts about Android were really scary. I've heard a lot of horror stories about Android: instability, bad battery performance, heating problems, cumbersome hardware, and so on. Usually, I never buy cheap things. But after some research I realized, that for the half of the price of an iPhone 6s Plus I can get one of the Android flagships with a much better camera, the same 5.5” display, but smaller and lighter than the iPhone 6s Plus! And so I bought my first Android phone ever: an LG G4 with a black leather back for less than a half of an iPhone 6s Plus!

There is nothing an iPhone can do what Android couldn't. But there are a lot of small surprises in the LG G4, which are out of reach for an iPhone.

I can exchange my battery (ok, mildly relevant)

I extended the storage space with an 18€ SD card to about 90GB; for the first time in my life, I have all the music I want on my phone.

My phone has an IR blaster; now I turn on my stereo using my phone; then I stream Spotify music to it. I don't event know at the moment, where the remote control is...

I activate the display and put it to sleep by a double tap on it; this is so addictive, that I keep tapping now on every mobile device to activate it.
I can take selfies saying "cheese"; it's fun, but not really relevant.

After 6 years of iPhones I could finally send my address book to my car over Bluetooth.

By the color of the blinking LED I know whose message I got without touching the phone.

...after one month of LG G4 usage I just cannot find any arguments to switch back to an iPhone in the nearest feature. Not a single one. I've heard, that the iPhone 7 won't have any hardware buttons anymore. I'm glad to hear, that the iPhone users start to enjoy all the things I have today.

More at Notehub

The commentary about switching from the iPhone to Android spawned a thread in the Android subreddit, and redditors there weren't shy about sharing their thoughts:

g1aiz: ”This reflects pretty good why I won't ever get an iPhone. They might be really good devices but for me I can't justify spending that kind of money if I can get a more than capable device for half or even less of the price.”

1leggeddog: ”Yup. The money aspect alone is why ill never get one. And the lack of customization. I LOVE fiddling around and making my electronics mine.”

lzick: ”I had an iPhone 6s, before returning it and switching to a Note 5 a little over a week later.

First off, there's a lot to love in the iPhone 6s. The build is incredible, the lag is minimal (it is there sometimes), the apps seem to really all fit in with ios and usually come out first, the camera was amazing (coming from a HTC One M8, but not as good as my Note 5, in my opinion), live pictures were fun, the fingerprint sensor was insanely fast and the 3D touch stuff felt a little underutilized, but it was insanely cool pressing hard on the screen to do new actions like task switching or precise text input.

The phone's design is incredible. There's absolutely no flaw in this hardware, in my opinion, except for the bad speaker (would love front facing speakers), camera bulge (which is minor) and screen resolution of the 6s.

Okay, so why didn't I like it?

Well, first off, the UI. The UI for these iPhones are bad, because these apps and general UI are still intended for 3" - small 4"+ inch phones that were easily, fully reachable by almost all people of different sizes. For a 4.7" phone, it's not difficult for me to reach the top left of the phone every second to go back or whatever, but it's still slightly annoying. That would be about ten times worse on a 5.7" phone with a bottom bezel booty like the iPhone 6s+. It's possible, but it would be extremely irritating after about 4 times.

Also, about that UI. The back button issue is real. I know Android's can be inconsistent at times, for sure. It can be weird with how things are handled, but 9 out of 10 times you know where you're going to go back to I believe. On the iPhone, there's obviously no back button at all, so there's that problem, but it creates a whole other problem of UI navigation hesitation. I call that not knowing what to do and basically entering a stand-still for a second or so thinking or just trying everything. Sometimes you can swipe back, sometimes there's a back button in the app, sometimes there's a back button at the top left of the app (that is provided by the UI, not in-app) and sometimes there's nothing. It's confusing, frustrating and just plain silly sometimes.

(That reminds me, the home button makes me a little confused too. It sends you home with a press, it allows you to talk to Siri by pressing and holding it, it brings up the task switcher by double pressing it, and finally it brings the screen down into reachability ((which is not a good or viable solution)) mode by double tapping it; and people say Android is confusing.)

Some issues were with the 6s specifically, like the resolution and lack of OIS (which I didn't realize the importance of until I got a phone with it) but I knew the issues I had with the software would just be exacerbated by the size increase, so it wasn't a viable option either for me.

Then there was just some random stuff I missed every day. I missed the notifications on Android. I missed having a contact's messages grouped into one notification pane, instead of listing every single message by them in a cluttered mess. I missed easily sharing content on apps like Hangouts that weren't baked in like iMessage. I missed being able to just download a video from the internet browser. Just things like that.

So yeah, the iPhone wasn't for me. I just didn't care for ios's design when it came to phones that weren't extremely small, relative to today's standards. The hardware is almost perfect, except for the resolution (which is noticeable coming from 1080p), the slight camera bulge and AWFUL (I can't stress this enough, and everyone on /r/Apple[1] agrees, and says it's due to stealth waterproofing) speaker on the phone. Unfortunately, it wasn't enough to keep me around and stick with the iPhone experience though.

It definitely made me approach Android and its approach more though, and it also shined some light on some of its flaws too.”

Aksjruw: ”The iPhone seems to built with the assumption that users would use one app at a time. Until recently, it had only primitive facilities for inter-app communication with each app developer having to hard-code every other app it could interoperate with. Android, however, was designed from the start to help users juggle multiple apps...”

Infamous: ”This was a very fair and unbiased review in my opinion up to this point, I'd like to see if it's less or more biased in his 1 year update. He's now experienced the compatability of android, and I think a lot of the younger generation [my generation] will stop buying iphones when mom and dad aren't paying for them. I'm excited to see his 1 year review.”

Cthomas: ”Thank you for this. I'm a 6 year iPhone user myself and my iPhone 5 is on its last breath. This article has sealed my decision. Now which android device should I get? ”

Kunbun: ”My sister had the same experience switching to a Note 4 after being an iPhone user since the first one. The only thing she misses is iMessage,but only because a lot of her friends use that to communicate with each other. ”

More at Reddit

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