A better blocker is available to shield you from coerced 'Get Windows 10' updates

A better blocker is available to shield you from coerced 'Get Windows 10' updates
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The updated GWX Control Panel can help if your Win7 or 8.1 PC insists on upgrading you to Windows 10

Josh Mayfield, the guy behind GWX Control Panel, has released an update for his package that protects users from coerced Windows 10 updates. He's found a few new tricks to delete the 6GB-or-so folder that Microsoft may have put on your PC without your knowledge or permission. He's also found a new way to detect and remove hidden Windows 10 installation files that may be in the $Windows.~BT and $Windows.~WS folders.

Mayfield is honing in on particular aspects of fighting Microsoft's "Get Windows 10" campaign. This update goes further in cleaning out the gunk if you're stuck with the Upgrade to Windows 10 notice in Windows Update. It can also restabilize your PC if you were the victim of Microsoft's week-long "it was a mistake" campaign to surreptitiously check the "Upgrade to Windows 10" optional Windows Update patch.

I suggest that all Windows 7 and 8.1 customers download the latest version of GWX Control Panel, run it now, and use its buttons to Disable operating system upgrades in Windows Update, Clear Windows Update Cache, and Delete Windows 10 Download folders. Keep it around and rerun it any time you apply updates from Microsoft to your PC. If you have Windows set to apply updates automatically, it wouldn't hurt to run it every day.

When you're ready to install Windows 10 on your own terms, you can turn the whole Get Windows 10 mechanism back on using GWX Control Panel. With Microsoft poised to release "optional" Windows 10 Upgrade patches through Windows Update -- and now openly states those optional updates will become "recommended," or checked, early next year -- now's a good time to put up your shields.

Last week Windows honcho Terry Myerson promised that the seedy Get Windows 10 campaign would get a shut-off switch:

You can specify that you no longer want to receive notifications of the Windows 10 upgrade through the Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 settings pages.

I haven't seen that switch yet, but I'll let you know the minute it appears.

Don't hold your breath.

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