Patch KB 3105208 for Windows 10 beta build 10565 triggers BSODs

With Windows 10's forced update policy there's no obvious way to protect your system

Patch KB 3105208 for Windows 10 beta build 10565 triggers BSODs

As the next version of Windows 10, code-named Threshold 2, nears sign-off, there have been two back-to-back patches for the latest beta build, 10565. The latest patch, KB 3105208, was released Thursday night and triggers repeated blue screens on a large number of PCs.

I call it a nightmare scenario because there's no obvious way to protect your system. With Windows 10's forced update policy, even if you can get Windows 10 to boot again (most likely by reverting to an earlier restore point or possibly by re-installing an old drive image, if you kept one), you're going to get stuck the next time Windows Update comes up for air.

The only solution is to hide the update with wushowhide. As I explained two months ago, wushowhide can only be used to hide a patch after it's been downloaded, installed, and clobbered your system. You can't go into your Windows 10 PC right now and proactively hide the patch before it takes out your system.

(There's a workaround circulating on the Internet that involves disabling Secure Boot in BIOS, restarting, installing the patch, and restarting again. One problem: If you re-enable Secure Boot, the patch triggers another BSOD.)

Of course, there's no documentation about KB 3105208; we have no idea what it's supposed to do. Considering the rumors that Threshold 2 (also known as Windows 10 Fall Update -- a horrible name for many reasons) will hit RTM this week, I can only assume it contains last-minute fixes.

This much I know: KB 3105208 locks up a significant percentage of Windows 10 beta PCs. Imagine what'll happen if/when a patch out in the real world clobbers 10 percent, 1 percent, or even 0.1 percent of all the Win10 PCs. Talk about a cyber attack.

I don't know if it's hubris, a lack of planning, or stubborn adherence to an outdated dogma, but Microsoft's insistence on forcing stealthy patches will kill Windows 10.

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