Microsoft confirms patch KB 3022345 breaks SFC /scannow

Microsoft confirms patch KB 3022345 breaks SFC /scannow
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But reports that system files have been corrupted are wrong, even though Microsoft's own tool provides the diagnosis

We've had a long ride with patch KB 3022345, the Diagnostic Tracking Service patch that has gone through at least four versions since April 21. Many of you reported to me that running a Windows file check command, SFC /scannow, returned reports that "Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but was unable to fix some of them."

Now, more than a month later, we have assurances from Microsoft that even though SFC says the system files are corrupt, in fact they aren't.

Here's the official word, from the KB article (now up to version 6):

This update enables the Diagnostics Tracking Service in Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1), and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. This tracking service collects data about functional issues in Windows.

This update contains the following two manifests that are occasionally updated by the Diagnostic Tracking Service:

 telemetry.ASM-WindowsDefault.json

 utc.app.json

The two files are marked as static files in the update. When an advanced user runs the System File Checker Tool (sfc.exe), the files are unintentionally flagged as corrupted. There is no impact or corruption on a device that is running this update, and this issue will be fixed in a later service update. 

Of course, the problem gets flagged when a not-so-advanced user runs SFC. At least we have some warning that there's another version of KB 3022345 headed for the Automatic Update chute.

Microsoft has once again deftly sidestepped the question about what this patch does. As I reported earlier this month, we knew it was jiggering telemetry.ASM-WindowsDefault.json and utc.app.json. Apparently it's associated with the Windows 10 rollout, but anything beyond that is just speculation.

Why won't Microsoft simply tell us what the patch does, so we can decide if we want to install it?

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