Who writes the Linux kernel?

In today's open source roundup: Find out who's writing Linux these days. Plus: Future Studio OS is designed for creative people, and run Android on your Windows device

Who writes Linux?

When some folks think about who is responsible for writing Linux, they probably have visions of basement dwelling outcasts from society toiling away on their computers day after day. But the truth is far from that stereotypical delusion. It turns out that most of the people writing Linux are a different breed altogether.

SJVN reports for ZDNet:

...19.4 percent of all Linux kernel development done since September 2013 appears to have been done by individual developers, but the rest has all been created by corporate programmers. Leading the way were Intel employees with 10.5 percent of Linux code to their credit. Following Intel was Red Hat, 8.4 percent; Linaro, 5.6 percent; Samsung, 4.4 percent; IBM 3.2 percent; and SUSE, 3 percent. In short, as the Linux Foundation report observes, "well over 80% of all kernel development is demonstrably done by developers who are being paid for their work."

This report covers work completed through Linux kernel 3.18, with an emphasis on releases 3.11 to 3.18. Looking closely at the contributors, it's clear that x86 Linux is still the heart of Linux kernel development community. The presence of Linaro and Samsung also point out that ARM and Android respectively are getting their fair share of programmer time as well.

All together more than 4,000 developers from 200 companies have contributed to the kernel. Half of the kernel developers were contributing for the first time. That number may look large, and it is, but the Foundation also found that "there is still a relatively small number who are doing the majority of the work. In any given development cycle, approximately 1/3 of the developers involved contribute exactly one patch." Since the 2.6.11 release, the top ten developers have contributed 36,664 changes -- 8.2 percent of the total. The top thirty developers contributed just over 17 percent of the all the code.

More at ZDNet

You can download the report for yourself from the Linux Foundation's site:

The kernel which forms the core of the Linux system is the result of one of the largest cooperative software projects ever attempted.

Regular 2-3 month releases deliver stable updates to Linux users, each with significant new features, added device support, and improved performance. The rate of change in the kernel is high and increasing, with over 10,000 patches going into each recent kernel release. Each of these releases contains the work of over 1,400 developers representing over 200 corporations.

Since 2005, some 11,800 individual developers from nearly 1,200 different companies have contributed to the kernel. The Linux kernel, thus, has become a common resource developed on a massive scale by companies which are fierce competitors in other areas.

More at The Linux Foundation

Future Studio OS

There's a new Linux distribution for creative people called Future Studio OS that is designed to make music, videos and graphics. This new distribution is based on Debian, and offers low latency audio and a kernel geared toward multimedia.

Marius Nestor reports on Future Studio for Softpedia:

The time has come to introduce you guys to a new Linux kernel-based operating system, designed for creative people who were searching for a good-looking, reliable, and modern distribution for all of their multimedia creation needs. Future Studio OS is based on a mix between Debian GNU/Linux Jessie and Sid, using a low-latency Linux kernel and the KDE4 desktop environment.

The latest build of the Future Studio OS 2 operating system is now available for download, though it is not mentioned anywhere whether the system is stable or not. As its name suggests, it is an OS designed for the future, for 64-bit computing, that allows you to make astonishing graphics, beautiful music, and entertaining videos with the help of some of the best open-source applications.

More at Softpedia

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