A developer's-eye view of Leopard, part IV

64-bit Darwin, Dashcode, Time Machine, and Ruby on Rails call on developers to trade out established skills for new ones

And by all means, whether you start now or upgrade in October, plan to do your development in Leopard. Once you use Leopard, you will get hooked on the strengths that Leopard headliners such as Core Animation and Time Machine bring to your applications and their users. Leopard will spawn ideas for creative solutions that wouldn’t have occurred to you for any prior release of OS X.

Additional resources
Review: Leopard Server: The people's UNIX
Mac OS X v10.5 is true UNIX on the inside, novice admin friendly on the outside, and born for collaboration, with turnkey-simple blog, wiki, IM, and calendar services
Review: Mac OS X Leopard: A perfect 10
Apple's new operating system and its massive new feature set challenge users and developers to explore new and better ways of working
A developer's-eye view of Leopard, part I
Xray and Core Animation stand out among Apple's immense bag of new Leopard tricks
A developer's-eye view of Leopard, part II
Leopard's Xcode3.0 integrated development environment and Objective-C 2.0 language help define the Mac platform
A developer's-eye view of Leopard, part III
Cocoa and other sweet object-oriented frameworks magically make all Mac apps part of an integrated suite
A developer's-eye view of Leopard, part IV
64-bit Darwin, Dashcode, Time Machine, and Ruby on Rails call on developers to trade out established skills for new ones
Tom Yager: Enterprise Mac

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