'SOA is inevitable'?

Perhaps 'SOA is inevitable,' but the degree of adoption will be larger dependent on our ability to put the right business case to the people who own and control budgets

I'm at the Software AG Innovation conference today down in Miami. I'm only able to attend today and part of tomorrow, and today I'm attending "the SOA Master Class," indeed as I write this blog.

Miko Matsumura was first to speak during the class, and seems to be the vision guy for the Software AG SOA dream team. One of the key messages he continued to state and restate was that "SOA is inevitable." Here is a photo of Miko speaking. I'm in the back behind a wall in order to use a power outlet, as usual.

Can't argue with "SOA is inevitable," indeed he made a compelling case. However, in looking around the room, it seems that SOA is clearly valuable for those…well…who are practicing SOA.

What's key is to make the case for SOA to the business people, or those who own and control the budgets. During tough times like these, SOA is largely considered one of those "special projects" and thus funding is quickly reduced or removed when money is tight.

However, those that are more clearly thinking will find their analysis leads them to the conclusion that if indeed SOA is able to deliver on the value of agility and simplicity, then the business value will be there well beyond the money that's spent initially. The correct question is: Would it make sense to spend some money now, for a 5x return in three years?

Unfortunately, U.S. companies are more reactive in nature, and everything is planned around the next four months, not the next four years. Thus, they continue to dig the architectural complexity and inefficiency hold deeper and deeper.

So, perhaps "SOA is inevitable," but the degree of adoption will be larger dependent on our ability to put the right business case around this.

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