Disclaimer Explained

Roy Russo, of Loopfuse, said: "I have to say the funniest things about your posts are: "The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions." I guess its indicative of you not working for an OSS company, like the other editors on here. ;-)" I'm not sure if that is a compliment but I'll take whatever I can get :-) I was going to reply in the comments, but t

Roy Russo, of Loopfuse, said:

"I have to say the funniest things about your posts are: "The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions."

I guess its indicative of you not working for an OSS company, like the other editors on here. ;-)"

I'm not sure if that is a compliment but I'll take whatever I can get :-)

I was going to reply in the comments, but thought how many of you read the comments?

I'm "required" to have such a disclaimer as per IBM's blogging guidelines. Most IBMers have that text on the "About" page or somewhere on the homepage as I do on my personal blog. At InfoWorld, I've started to add the text to my posts because I doubt anyone reads the About page.

But the main reason is that a well respected IT journalist suggested that I make my IBM connection clear on every post. I don't mind doing it because I don't want anyone to think I am an IBM marketing vehicle. Yes, my views are formed by the experiences I've had at and through IBM. But I try to speak my mind (i.e. my views on MySQL which may not be shared by every IBMer).

So, the disclaimer is partly attributed to IBM requirements, and partly because I am somewhat of an Alien (in the US immigration sense of the word) in the OSS vendor community. But mostly because nobody trusts Canadians. :-)

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