How not to deal with fraud

My friend Desmond recently got an invoice from Dell for two DLP projectors. He hadn't ordered any DLP projectors. They weren't shipped to his house, either. Instead, they went to Roosevelt Island, NY (NB: Roosevelt Island? Really?). Obviously he was perplexed and called Dell. Well, he tried anyway. While American Express handled this with aplomb, Dell, well, didn't. In fact, they didn't seem to care. What makes

My friend Desmond recently got an invoice from Dell for two DLP projectors. He hadn't ordered any DLP projectors. They weren't shipped to his house, either. Instead, they went to Roosevelt Island, NY (NB: Roosevelt Island? Really?). Obviously he was perplexed and called Dell. Well, he tried anyway. While American Express handled this with aplomb, Dell, well, didn't. In fact, they didn't seem to care.

What makes this more interesting is that Desmond is the IT Director for a sizable technology company that has done significant business with Dell for many years. As he notes "When I order something from Dell for my business, they will not ship to any address than the addresses on my credit card. Why did Dell do it for this order?"

Suffice it to say, this is a very poor example of how to deal with a very troubling issue. Here's the full post.

Recommended
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies