Thinking about a ComCast business circuit? Think again.

This is unfortunately a tale of woe. There are no names in this story to protect the innocent, but rest assured, dear reader, this is completely true. Over six months ago, a signed contract and $1,000 in build-out fees were sent to the ComCast Business division. This was to be a business-class circuit with a single fixed IP address to handle overflow from existing T1 circuits. ComCast already had copper and fibe

This is unfortunately a tale of woe. There are no names in this story to protect the innocent, but rest assured, dear reader, this is completely true.

Over six months ago, a signed contract and $1,000 in build-out fees were sent to the ComCast Business division. This was to be a business-class circuit with a single fixed IP address to handle overflow from existing T1 circuits. ComCast already had copper and fiber in the immediate area, and simply needed to run it into the building, which was one of two brand-new multi-tenant office buildings in an office park -- a third building was under construction. The contract terms and fees has taken nearly two months to sort out, with an email trail that smacked more of Abbot and Costello than a business deal, including blatant, repeated, and honestly puzzling misspellings of the company name, forgotten details, and wrong paperwork. But that's in the past right? Pen has been put to paper, the contracts are signed, money has changed hands, and the waiting begins.

It's not just waiting though. The word 'waiting' evokes a passive tone, but this wasn't exactly passive. It took ComCast months to send a request to the building management to do the install, even though they claimed that the building had never responded. After another month of wrangling to get the paperwork, it was signed and returned the same day. During this time, not one, but *two* requests were made by ComCast that the company resend the original contract to ComCast, since they lost it. Twice. Yes, they lost their own contract. Twice. Following that, there was a spark of action -- a site visit from a third-party wiring contractor. The anticipation generated from that visit was palpable but for naught, since several months later the situation hadn't changed. All the network hardware had been ordered, arrived, and configured, waiting for the one cable to make it functional -- yet there was nothing there, and nothing on the horizon. ComCast is a deadzone -- a complete lack of communication. Repeated emails go unanswered. Phone calls terminate without any voicemail or actual live person. A black hole.

Meanwhile, existing Internet circuits are running 80-90% utilization and complaints are mounting. Telling people that more bandwidth had been ordered over six months ago simply doesn't work anymore.

So the moral of this story is that ComCast Business has nothing to do with business -- in fact, it might just be a figment of our collective imaginations... except that $1,000 check was very real.

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