Network Solutions under attack

It appears that Network Solutions is the target of a large-scale, prolonged DDoS attack, and the company has been blocking large ranges of public IP addresses from accessing any of their resources in order to fight the attack

I've been trying to figure out what is wrong with Network Solutions for a few weeks now. After I posted about their questionable practice of returning incorrect answers for non-authoritative queries on some of their nameservers, I started receiving e-mails and comments on my blog posts about folks outside of the United States who could not access any resources from Network Solutions: no e-mail, Web hosting, their main Web site -- nothing.

It appears that the reason for this is that Network Solutions is the target of a large-scale, prolonged DDoS attack, and the company has been blocking large ranges of public IP addresses from accessing any of their resources in order to fight the attack. Of course, very many legitimate users have been caught in these nets.

Details are sketchy at the moment, but I have been contacted by the company and am quite interested in finding out the details of this situation. I do find it quite amazing that they've been able to keep this under the radar for so long, since it appears that the attack has lasted for several weeks at least.

Generally speaking, DDoS attacks of this scale are "earned," at least according to the attackers. Network Solutions has never enjoyed a great reputation with the Internet underworld, although I don't know of anything specific that might have elicited this response.

In any event, to those reading this in hopes of finally regaining access to their Web sites and e-mail, I don't have good news. As one commenter remarked on my post this morning:

"I asked them to unblock our range since we are their customer and our servers and host are not in any way involved with the DDOS. NetSol's suggestion was to change IP addresses for our web servers. Obviously, this is not an easy thing to do on short notice."

Asking a customer to re-IP their Web servers due to this issue is simply absurd, so it certainly appears that they have no good way to deal with this problem at the moment. It would seem that many people using NETSOL are, well, SOL. At least for now.

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