ComCastastrophe Resolved

A few months ago, I wrote about a ComCast Business circuit that had yet to be installed, despite the fact that the contract had been signed and initial fees paid six months prior. It was a sad tale, and one without resolution -- until Friday. Yes, on Friday, April 11th, just over eight months after the contract was signed, the circuit went live. Although ComCast had claimed several times during those months that

A few months ago, I wrote about a ComCast Business circuit that had yet to be installed, despite the fact that the contract had been signed and initial fees paid six months prior. It was a sad tale, and one without resolution -- until Friday.

Yes, on Friday, April 11th, just over eight months after the contract was signed, the circuit went live. Although ComCast had claimed several times during those months that the circuit would be installed "in two weeks", the last time they made this claim, they actually delivered -- two weeks to the day after hearing those words yet again, packets were passed, source routing was configured, and there was much rejoicing.

I've long thought that cable and DSL services make for solid overflow Internet bandwidth for many companies. While the tried-and-true T1 is still the best bet for reliable, synchronous bandwidth, they're too expensive for basic Internet browsing these days, with the relatively low cost of high-bandwidth cable and DSL circuits. Many firewalls can support multiple egress links, and many switches can handle the source routing tasks necessary to use two different circuits -- heck, in the absence of either of those, a really low-spec Linux box can handle the source routing -- so it makes all kinds of sense to go this route.

Of course, that's assuming that it doesn't take the better part of a year to install, but I would hope that is the exception and not the rule.

From CIO: 8 Free Online Courses to Grow Your Tech Skills
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies