Case study

Finally. It's taken Compaq/HP years to design a decent rack server case; years. I recall swearing at many a server produced by either company every time I had the misfortune of having to deal with hardware changes. Non-standard bolts, inaccessible RAM slots, byzantine cover unlatching methods, curious disk placement, and so forth. It's the stuff of nightmares. More than once I've shed blood while elbow deep in a

Finally.

It's taken Compaq/HP years to design a decent rack server case; years. I recall swearing at many a server produced by either company every time I had the misfortune of having to deal with hardware changes. Non-standard bolts, inaccessible RAM slots, byzantine cover unlatching methods, curious disk placement, and so forth. It's the stuff of nightmares. More than once I've shed blood while elbow deep in a server. Today I was doing an emergency replacement server build with a brand-spanking new HP Proliant DL380G3. This case is done right.

The top of the case unlatches with a single, simple pulltab. The fans snap in and out of mounts with a single spring catch. Same for the power supplies. The VLR and CPUs were installed and secured in seconds. DIMM slots are completely unobscured, and the HP/Compaq hot-swap SCSI enclosures are the best in the industry. The ordering of the disk enclosures 0-6 right-to-left is interesting, but overall, it's a smooth, sleek design. The newer workstation cases from HP/Compaq are also well designed with spare screws and quick-release rail bays.

Finally.

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