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At the moment, I'm finally getting around to installing Fedora Core 3 on a VMWare virtual server. If you're looking to download it, you should really try the torrent. The newest iteration of RedHat's community-support Linux distro was released last week so I'm just a bit late on the draw. Already, I can see some substantial changes over FC2. First, LVM is standard practice for an automatic partitioning scheme, a

At the moment, I'm finally getting around to installing Fedora Core 3 on a VMWare virtual server. If you're looking to download it, you should really try the torrent.

The newest iteration of RedHat's community-support Linux distro was released last week so I'm just a bit late on the draw. Already, I can see some substantial changes over FC2. First, LVM is standard practice for an automatic partitioning scheme, and SELinux is not only present in Anaconda, but lightly configurable during the install. The inclusion of XFCE as a desktop choice is also very smart, permitting a lighter-weight interface for servers. Kudos on all counts.

Other niceties noted were udev and sysfs configured by default, mDNS support, lm_sensors enabled by default and a modified 2.6.9 kernel running the show. Fedora has also opted to make use of /media instead of /mnt for the default mount root for cdroms and presumably other removeable media.

Amazingly, the new default desktop layout for Gnome is nearly identical to the layout that I use on my FC2 workstation, menus in the upper left, quick launch icons to the right of the menus, and a taskbar at the bottom. It was quite odd to see the default come so close to my own preferences... and those of Ximian. The Ximian Desktop is now property of Novell, of course, but FC3 definitely borrowed a few concepts in interface layout. Also worthy of note is that Mozilla isn't installed by default; FireFox 1.0 PR1.20 is the default browser. KDE 3.3, Gnome 2.8, Evolution 2.0, and GCC 3.4 round out the major package versions.

There have been a staggering amount of changes to this release, and what I've seen so far bodes well for RedHat, as Fedora is their testing ground for their Enterprise Linux line. I'll be digging in for sure, but it might take me awhile to upgrade any of my production workstations or laptops. By that time, FC4 Test 1 will probably be available. And so it goes.

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