How to say yes to (almost) any smartphone

Employees want iPhones, Androids, and other devices beyond the BlackBerry; here's how to safely welcome them

Page 5 of 7

Saying yes to smartphones: Securing the needs of Category 3 businesses for sensitive information
This level of business -- financial services, legal, HR, and health care -- is where businesses have to start making support choices that could displease users.

Apple iPhone. The iPhone supports all the requirements for this category. The issues and capabilities for Category 3 requirements are the same as those described for Category 1 businesses.

Where the iPhone becomes problematic is in the good-to-have capabilities. You can disable the camera and limit Wi-Fi access to specific SSIDs via the iPhone Configuration Utility's profiles. But there's no ability to control Bluetooth connections on an iPad in the iPhone Configuration Utility thus far, and no ability for any iPhone OS device (and thus not in the mobile management apps that use it for over-the-air provisioning) to restrict use of specific apps. You can disable the App Store, Safari, and iTunes, but those are heavy-handed control options that will reduce the iPhone's intrinsic utility and appeal.

Google Android. The Android OS lacks the services to provide most of this category's requirements, so it cannot legitimately meet the needs of Category 3 businesses.

Microsoft Windows Mobile. Windows Mobile supports all the requirements for this category, but you'll need Microsoft System Center Mobile Device Manager 2008, Good for Enterprise, or Mobile Iron products to handle the good-to-have option of managing which applications users may install. Otherwise, the issues and capabilities for Category 3 businesses are the same as those described for Category 1 businesses.

Nokia Symbian. Nokia supports all the requirements for this category. The issues and capabilities for Category 3 businesses are the same as those described for Category 1 businesses. For the good-to-have options, I could not find third-party management tools that provide them for Nokia's devices.

Palm Pre. WebOS lacks the services to provide most of this category's requirements, so it cannot legitimately meet the needs of Category 3 businesses.

RIM BlackBerry. The BlackBerry supports all the requirements for this category -- if you use the full version of BES with Notes or GroupWise, or either the free Express or the paid full version of BES for Exchange. (InfoWorld's comparison of the two editions of BES explains how to choose between them.) You'll need the full BES for the good-to-have features for all three email platforms. The issues and capabilities for Category 3 businesses are the same as those described for Category 1 businesses.

| 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Page 5
From CIO: 8 Free Online Courses to Grow Your Tech Skills
View Comments
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies