Employees cranky about Web browsing restrictions

Survey also found that four out of 10 professionals are more inclined to look for new opportunities outside their firms as a result of the recession

Workers who can't browse certain websites or access particular networks at the office are voicing their complaints, senior IT leaders say.

Among 1,400 CIOs surveyed by Robert Half Technology, 12 percent said it is "very common" and 29 percent said it is "somewhat common" for employees to complain about IT security measures that limit their access to certain websites or networks. (Also see the tech debate: Social network sites: Block or not?)

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The remainder of CIOs surveyed said such complaints about IT security policies are "somewhat uncommon" (29 percent) or "very uncommon" (29 percent).

Robert Half's survey of IT security policies, published this week, is based on telephone interviews with 1,400 CIOs from U.S. companies with 100 or more employees.

Separately, the staffing firm polled employees to gauge their attitudes about the workplace and shifting economy. In research published earlier this summer, Robert Half found that four out of 10 professionals are more inclined to look for new opportunities outside their firms as a result of the recession. In addition, 37 percent of employees felt they are not being fairly compensated for assuming a greater workload during the recession.

On the positive side, 28 percent of employees said they are more engaged in their work as a result of the recession.

Employees' next career steps appear to vary along age lines. For Generation Y employees (approximately 21 to 31 years old), looking for a new job is the most common post-recession career plan, whereas Generation Xers (32 to 45 years old) are more inclined to update their skills. Among baby boomers (46 to 64 years old) surveyed, staying put at their companies is the most commonly cited post-recession career plan.

Retirement plans are on hold in many cases. Nearly half (46 percent) of workers believe they will work past the traditional retirement age, and more than one-third said the recent recession has had a very strong impact on those plans.

"Many employees, particularly Gen Y professionals, are biding their time in their current employment situations and plan to make a move when they feel the economy is on firmer footing," said Brett Good, a Robert Half International district president, in a statement. "Now is the time for employers to take action and outline career paths within their company for strong performers. Compensation reviews also should be conducted to ensure that pay is competitive."

For its employee survey, Robert Half polled 1,400 professionals in North America (including 502 hiring managers) who are employed full-time and have college degrees, or are earning college degrees.

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This story, "Employees cranky about Web browsing restrictions" was originally published by Network World.

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