Google denies talks with Verizon to end Net neutrality

Reports say Verizon confirmed it has been in talks with Google and the FCC for 10 months and was close to a deal to pay for priority service

Google today denied reports that it is in talks with Verizon for a deal that could undermine Net neutrality.

According to reports in today's Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, Google and Verizon, both major online players, are close to finalizing an agreement that would have Verizon speeding some online content more quickly than other content if the content's creators pay for it. YouTube, which is owned by Google, could greatly benefit by having its bandwidth weighty videos get priority treatment.

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Google, however, told Computerworld this morning that there is no basis to the reports.

"The New York Times is quite simply wrong," wrote Mistique Cano, a Google spokesman, in an email. "We have not had any conversations with Verizon about paying for carriage of Google traffic. We remain as committed as we always have been to an open Internet."

However, the Wall Street Journal reported today that Verizon confirmed that it has been in ongoing talks with Google and the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for 10 months.

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at @sgaudin or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed. Her email address is sgaudin@computerworld.com.

Read more about networking in Computerworld's Networking Topic Center.

This story, "Google denies talks with Verizon to end Net neutrality" was originally published by Computerworld.

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