Survey confirms that users will adopt the cloud even if IT doesn't

Working around the IT Department of No is hardly new, but it seems to be easier -- and penalty-free -- in the cloud era

A recent survey conducted by the Microsoft-Accenture consultancy Avanade shows some obvious things, such as the fact that cloud computing is now a mature technology. However, it also shows that cloud computing causes some heartburn within many enterprises.

According to PC Magazine's Samara Lynn, "out of the 573 C-level executives, business unit leaders, and IT decision-makers surveyed, three key indicators of the maturing of cloud computing were made apparent: businesses have increased investments in resources to secure, manage, and support cloud computing; there is growing adoption and preference for private clouds; and a healthy interest in cloud computing for revenue-generating services." This is a 23 percent growth since 2009, according to the survey.

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But all is not well in the world of cloud computing. Many users find that they have to purchase and use cloud computing services without the consent or knowledge of corporate IT. In many instances, corporate IT has been pushing back on cloud computing. The use of cloud resources is really the departments trying to expedite the automation of some business processes without having to wait for IT to respond. And according to the survey, there are no penalties for a cloud without permission. So go for it -- you won't get fired.

Cloud computing is showing similar growth patterns to other technologies, including the fact that there are multiple paths into an enterprise. Moreover, working around IT seems to be a new pastime within larger companies, and IT seems to no longer drive the use of technology in many respects.

IT needs to get ahead of the use of cloud computing in order to begin moving to a larger and more value-oriented strategy, but as I've said several times in this blog, IT has often become the Department of No. Clearly, IT needs to take a more innovative approach to using new technology. Otherwise those who need to get business done will find cloud computing a low-friction and cost-efficient path all on their own.

This article, "Survey confirms that users will adopt the cloud even if IT doesn't," originally appeared at InfoWorld.com. Read more of David Linthicum's Cloud Computing blog and track the latest developments in cloud computing at InfoWorld.com. For the latest business technology news, follow InfoWorld.com on Twitter.