HP improves thin client performance with Velocity

HP also added an ARM-based client to its hardware portfolio aimed at call centers, education, healthcare, government, and hospitality environments

Hewlett-Packard's new Velocity software helps IT staff optimize network performance for users who work on its thin or zero clients, the company said on Wednesday.

The Velocity software, which is installed on both client and server, has been designed to improve thin client performance on networks that are buckling under the load of bandwidth-hungry applications and for telecommuters working offsite using bad network connections, according to HP.

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It does this by correcting network packet-loss errors without having to resend the packet, preventing noticeable latency, HP said.

HP Velocity is available worldwide as a standard feature on the t510 and the t610 thin clients. It will also be available on the HP t410 Smart Zero Client and HP t410 All-in-One Smart Zero Client beginning in August.

The t410 Smart Zero Client is a new addition to HP's portfolio that will be available in August priced from $269, according to the company. It is aimed at call centers, education, healthcare, government, and hospitality environments.

The t410 is powered by an ARM-based processor from Texas Instruments and has support for dual displays, each with a resolution of up to 1,920-by-1,080 pixels. It can be used in Microsoft, Citrix, and VMware environments.

ARM-processors are mostly known for powering smartphones, but have also become more popular on thin and zero clients.

Earlier this year Wyse Technology launched the T10, which also uses an ARM-based processor.

The reasoning behind that hardware choice was that ARM-based processors are very power efficient, which means it is easier to keep the client cool and it also becomes possible to build very small units, Wyse said at the time, and added that the processors are quite cheap, which helps keep the cost of the product down.

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