Should the CIO know how to code?

Non-tech CIOs are all the rage these days. Is that good or bad for IT?

On the organizational chart between IT Director "Ray Walton" and his CIO is a vice-president of IT whom he considers dangerous.

Why? Because that VP came from finance. He's not technical, and worse, he maintains a financial mindset. "In his mind, everything in technology can be reduced to dollars and time," says Walton, who, to protect his job, asked that his real name not be used.

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Walton angrily maintains that this finance-first attitude works only when everything is a commodity, which hasn't yet come to pass in technology. "It's still an art to determine risk and rewards in IT. If you only look at ROI, you'll never build a network, because it's infrastructure. There is no 'payback.'"

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