SharePoint 2010 cheat sheet

How to find your way around SharePoint 2010 and make the most of its features

SharePoint has taken the world by storm. As of last year, if Microsoft broke SharePoint's revenue out as a single entity, it would have created the fifth largest software company in existence, according to Jared Spataro, senior director of SharePoint product management at Microsoft.

All told, hundreds of thousands of SharePoint licenses and millions of installations of both the free and the paid enterprise edition exist in the world. All of which means there's a good chance you use SharePoint -- even just a little bit -- if you have any sort of corporate job. But most users barely scratch the surface of what is possible in Microsoft's premier collaboration platform. Or perhaps your company has been using SharePoint 2007 and now you've got 2010 rolled out, and you're feeling lost.

[ J. Peter Bruzzese calls SharePoint 2010 "polished, refined, and feature-rich," and he looks forward to SharePoint 2013, a low-key update you'll love. | Discover what's new in business applications with InfoWorld's Technology: Applications newsletter. ]

Share this story. IT folks: We hope you'll pass this guide on to your users to help them learn the SharePoint 2010 ropes.

There's nothing to worry about. With this cheat sheet, you'll learn all of the basics of navigating and using a SharePoint site, and where to go to find some of the most popular customization options as well.

And don't forget to take a look at our Microsoft Office 2010 cheat sheets too:

Word 2010, Excel 2010, Outlook 2010 and PowerPoint 2010.

Note: There are a couple of versions of SharePoint 2010. One is free of charge and is called SharePoint Foundation 2010; the other is a licensed, enterprise-ready product called Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010. While they both look the same and have the same feel for users, SharePoint Server offers a few additional features, such as those for really advanced workflows, "my" sites where you can post status updates and blog entries, and a lot of administrative functions. In this piece, we'll focus on the very commonly used SharePoint Foundation 2010 version, which has 100% of what users need.

If you're just starting with SharePoint
(If you're a veteran SharePoint user and want to start with what's new in the 2010 version, you might want to go directly to the next section. Also check out our "5 tips for using SharePoint 2010" related story, with advice that's a bit more advanced than most of what you'll find here.)

slide_image_SP-content-types-525.jpg
What a page looks like inside SharePoint. Click to view larger image .

SharePoint's primary reason for being is to serve as a place where things can be shared. This can include everything from documents to calendars to lists to pictures to discussion boards and more. All of it can be a part of a SharePoint site, and any user you designate within your organization's network -- and in some cases, even users outside of your network such as partners or vendors -- can then access those pieces and collaborate with you.

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