AT&T to customers: Net neutrality is whatever we say it is

Wireless giant says it can do whatever it pleases with preloaded apps, Net neutrality and ticked-off customers be damned

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Dear AT&T: We know you know that many of your customers hate you. Why else would you consistently land in last place in customer satisfaction surveys year after year? But acting like you don't give a damn whether they hate you isn't a good way to get them to stop. Just sayin'.

In somewhat related news, it seems the Oakland, Calif., Police Department has been having a rash of problems with the radios in its squad cars not working, until someone figured out the cause: AT&T's cell towers were interfering with them. That's the first time I can recall anyone complaining that AT&T's signals were too strong.

(To be fair, I am writing this from a coastal island location that shall not be disclosed lest the black helicopters find me. My T-Mobile data connection is crawling at submodem speeds, while my traveling companion's AT&T connection is humming along at 3G or better. Your wireless mileage may vary.)

AT&T certainly doesn't hold a monopoly on arrogance. To some degree, all companies that reach a certain size seem to develop a bunker mentality where they feel the world either a) doesn't understand them or b) is out to get them. But it really seems like AT&T doesn't much care what its customers think of it. That is an excellent way to find yourself suddenly running short of them. You can only tick people off for so long before they start leaving you when the first viable alternative comes along.

Has AT&T jumped the shark, finally? Leave your thoughts below at the beep, or email me:

This article, "AT&T to customers: Net neutrality is whatever we say it is," was originally published at Follow the crazy twists and turns of the tech industry with Robert X. Cringely's Notes from the Field blog, and subscribe to Cringely's Notes from the Underground newsletter.

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