Review: Box beats Dropbox -- and all the rest -- for business

Box trumps Dropbox, Egnyte, Citrix ShareFile, EMC Syncplicity, and OwnCloud with rich mix of file sync, file sharing, user management, deep reporting, and enterprise integration

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Dropbox for Business
Businesses have long fretted about Dropbox being a potential security hole, but no one can deny that its convenience, utility, and familiarity make for a compelling way to share files among multiple computers and users. Small wonder Dropbox has gone on to offer a business-level tier for its services, with a slew of security, team management, and reporting functions.

Dropbox for Business doesn't have the breadth or granularity of functions found in competing services, so it's best for smaller, more intimate teams that don't need as much top-down control. But using it is a snap to anyone who has a Dropbox account, and storage isn't metered for a full-blown business account. Whereas Dropbox Pro is $99 per user per year with 100GB of storage, the Business tier is $795 per year for five users (plus $125 for each additional user per year) with no storage limits.

[ UPDATE: Dropbox for Business improves, but still lags the competition ]

To use Dropbox for Business, you can either go with an existing Dropbox account or create a new one from scratch. The first account on a given team is automatically made an administrative account. Adding team members is functionally similar to the way existing Dropbox users invite each other to share resources: type a name, pick a user. Once a user has been added to the team, the only obvious change in the way Dropbox works is that some behaviors -- such as sharing links to nonteam members -- may be administratively restricted. A shared folder that appears in all Dropbox accounts for the team can also be automatically created.

Admins for a business account have access to a dashboard where they can survey their Dropbox account by user or activity. Each user's devices, browser sessions, apps, and activity are shown, and you can download CSVs of team activity reports -- who signed on from where, what members were added, and so on. Browser sessions can be closed, devices unlinked, and third-party Dropbox apps can be disabled for all users from this interface.

Organizations who want greater security over their Dropbox setup can elect to turn on a number of different authentication mechanisms, including two-step verification. You can also configure single sign-on via Active Directory or a third-party SSO provider, though you can't always use two-step verification and single sign-on together. Another useful security feature is a global password reset button, which provides a handy way to lock everything down at once in a matter of seconds.

One of the bigger shortcomings of Dropbox for Business is the lack of auditing tools for files themselves. You can't, for instance, inspect the contents of an individual user's account or look up an earlier revision of a file. The only way to do those things is to log in as the user and browse his or her files. Further, the activity reports lack details about uploads and external shares, which also makes auditing difficult.

Another potential gotcha stems from Dropbox's popularity with consumers. End-users with personal Dropbox accounts will want to create a separate account specifically for team access, lest they accidentally conflate files between the two. For bigger corporate setups, this isn't likely to be an obstacle, but informal teams with only a few people will need to be cautious. Fortunately the Dropbox folks seem to be aware of this: When you're invited to a team, you're given the option to join with your currently logged-in account or to create a whole new one.

Dropbox for Business
Dropbox for Business’s team management features make it easy to corral a slew of existing Dropbox users into a working team. On the downside, the member activity reports lack too much detail to be really useful.
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