Why green IT is good for business

As these companies have discovered, when IT projects focus on operational efficiency, sustainability benefits usually follow.


IT also collaborated with the in-house travel group to encourage videoconferencing in lieu of travel. To do that, it created a JavaScript program within the travel services portal that determines when users request travel between locations where videoconferencing services are available and offers to redirect users to a videoconferencing reservations page before they complete their flight arrangements. "That increased videoconferencing by 85 percent in just three months," which increased productivity by reducing travel downtime, saved energy and reduced the company's carbon footprint by 60 percent in one fell swoop, McGann says. "What I'm most proud of is that the IT organization has been a constant contributor by engaging with nontraditional partners within the organization," he adds.

Many companies have adopted virtualization-by-default policies, and IT needs to extend that to "design green by default," says McGann. It's easier to make the business case when starting fresh, because retrofits are more expensive. But it's also important to have a clear understanding of what sort of commitment management is making toward energy and carbon reduction and align projects to meet those strategic goals.

"Many projects will align with an energy reduction goal or a leadership commitment the CEO has made," he says. "And once you connect the dots you can get leadership to go forward."

Read more about data center in Computerworld's Data Center Topic Center.

This story, "Why green IT is good for business" was originally published by Computerworld.

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