SDN: The security pros and cons of using it in your organization

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SDN benefits include automating and easing network admin duties and improving app performance. But it also introduces a number of potential threats into your environment

Software defined networking (SDN) moves networking from hardware to the software plane, under management of a software controller. Benefits include automating and easing network administration duties and improving application performance. As a new technology, SDN is subject to vulnerabilities.

But with SDN, the industry knows certain vulnerabilities are native to the approach. First, according to Chris Weber, Co-Founder, Casaba, centralizing control in an SDN controller removes protective, layered hardware boundaries such as firewalls. Second, according to Gartner analyst Neil MacDonald, by decoupling the control plane from the data plane, SDN introduces new surface areas such as the network controller, its protocols and APIs to attack.

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