Review: 5 free Linux text editors a developer could love

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A programmer looks at the current versions of five well-known text editors and offers his take on how well they perform

Today's Linux text editors bridge the gap between the needs of high-end programmers and those of day-to-day users. These applications offer a range of functionality, from clean and user-friendly interfaces (preferred for normal text editing) to power-packed features (required for programming).

Most Linux users I've talked to tell me they want a text editor that can be used for normal text editing (and even some word processing) as well as for hard-core programming and coding. And, of course, they're looking for a low learning curve.

In this roundup, I assess five of the most well-known free text editors -- Gedit, GNU Emacs, GNU Nano, KATE and Vim. I have been using Linux for the past six years now, and my views are based on the practical experiences that I have had with each of them.

While most review round-ups try to answer the question "Which product is the best?" the real question in this case is: "Which one is best for you?" It all depends on what you require -- whether you are more comfortable with easier, graphic-based interfaces or just want a solid, down-and-dirty text editor. The following should provide some guidance as to where to look.

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