Review: The best password managers for PCs, Macs, and mobile devices

6 local and cloud-based password managers make passwords stronger and online life easier for Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, BlackBerry, and Windows Phone users

Thanks to high-profile computer security scares such as the Heartbleed vulnerability and the Target data breach, and to the allegations leveled at the government and cloud providers by Edward Snowden, more of us Internet users are wising up about the security of our information. One of the smarter moves we can make to protect ourselves is to use a password manager. It's one of the easiest too.

A password manager won't shield you against Heartbleed or the NSA, but it's an excellent first step in securing your identity, helping you increase the strength of the passwords that protect your online accounts because it will remember those passwords for you. A password manager will even randomly generate strong passwords, without requiring you to memorize or write down these random strings of characters. These strong passwords help shield against traditional password attacks such as dictionary, rainbow tables, or brute-force attacks.

[ Also on InfoWorld: The 25 worst passwords of 2013 | 5 ways computer security has truly advanced. | It's time to take another look at security. Two former CIOs show you how to rethink your security strategy for today's world. Bonus: Available in PDF and e-book versions. | Stay up to date on the latest security developments with InfoWorld's Security Central newsletter. ]

Many password managers allow you to automatically populate your password vault by capturing your Web log-ins using a browser plug-in and allowing you to store these credentials. Other options for populating your password database include importing an Excel spreadsheet or manually entering your log-in information. Further, using these stored credentials is typically automated using a browser plug-in, which recognizes the website's username and password fields, then populates these fields with the appropriate log-in information.

Although several browsers offer similar functionality out of the box, many password managers offer several benefits over the built-in browser functionality -- including encryption, cross-platform and cross-browser synchronization, mobile device support, secure sharing of credentials, and support for multifactor authentication. In some cases, usernames and passwords must be copied from the password manager into the browser, reducing the ease-of-use but increasing the level of security by requiring entry of the master password before accessing stored log-in information.

Some password managers store your credentials locally, others rely on cloud services for storage and synchronization, and still others take a hybrid approach. Some of the options using local storage (such as KeePass and 1Password) still support synchronization through Dropbox or other storage services. Deciding which password manager is best for you will come down to features and ease-of-use, as well as to whether you're comfortable storing your passwords on the Internet.

InfoWorld Scorecard
Features (30.0%)
Setup (15.0%)
OS support (20.0%)
Ease of use (25.0%)
Value (10.0%)
Overall Score (100%)
1Password 4.0 8.0 7.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 7.9
Dashlane 2.4.1 9.0 8.0 7.0 8.0 7.0 8.0
KeePass 2.26 10.0 7.0 8.0 7.0 10.0 8.4
LastPass 3.1.2 10.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 9.0 8.7
PasswordBox 1.3 8.0 8.0 7.0 8.0 8.0 7.8
SplashID Safe 7.2.3 7.0 7.0 8.0 7.0 7.0 7.2
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